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I have a list:

a = [32, 37, 28, 30, 37, 25, 27, 24, 35, 55, 23, 31, 55, 21, 40, 18, 50,
             35, 41, 49, 37, 19, 40, 41, 31]

max element is 55 (two elements on position 9 and 12)

I need to find on which position the maximum elements are situated. Please, help.

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5  
It also looks like homework. –  John Percival Hackworth Oct 21 '10 at 15:20
2  
And a duplicate, too. –  S.Lott Oct 21 '10 at 15:48
    
possible duplicate of How to return the maximum element of a list in Python? –  S.Lott Oct 21 '10 at 15:48
1  
@S.Lott: it probably is a dupe, but not for that question. I'll fix the title now. –  SilentGhost Oct 21 '10 at 15:57
    
the possible duplicate has at least some code shown by the OP. –  N 1.1 Oct 21 '10 at 16:19
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7 Answers

up vote 40 down vote accepted
>>> m = max(a)
>>> [i for i, j in enumerate(a) if j == m]
[9, 12]
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nice :) my first thought didn't include enumerate. I've become very rusty...oh, the horror! D: –  townsean Oct 21 '10 at 15:59
1  
Nice short answer if you don't mind making multiple passes through the list -- which is likely. –  martineau Oct 21 '10 at 19:06
    
It's "OK Corral" time ... see my answer. –  John Machin Oct 22 '10 at 1:31
    
I think this is very nice! –  Erik Garrison Feb 5 '13 at 17:18
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a.index(max(a))

will tell you the index of the first instance of the largest valued element of list a.

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This will only get you the first instance though and he asked for all the indexes where the largest value is found. You'd have to loop on that using slice to get the remaining list in each case and handling the exception when it's not found any longer. –  jaydel Oct 21 '10 at 16:38
3  
I did mention that it would only give the first instance. If you want all of them, SilentGhost's solution is much prettier and less error prone. –  nmichaels Oct 21 '10 at 16:42
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The chosen answer (and others) require at least two passes through the list. Here's a one pass solution.

Edited: To address the two deficiencies pointed out by @John Machin. For (2) I attempted to optimize the tests based on guesstimated probability of occurrence of each condition and inferences allowed from predecessors. It was a little tricky figuring out the proper initialization value formax_indices which worked for all possible cases, especially if the max happened to be the first value in the list.

a = [32, 37, 28, 30, 37, 25, 27, 24, 35, 55, 23, 31, 55, 21, 40, 18, 50,
             35, 41, 49, 37, 19, 40, 41, 31]

def maxelements(seq):
    ''' Return list of position(s) of largest element '''
    max_indices = []
    if seq:
        max_val = seq[0]
        for i,val in ((i,val) for i,val in enumerate(seq) if val >= max_val):
            if val == max_val:
                max_indices.append(i)
            else:
                max_val = val
                max_indices = [i]

    return max_indices
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2  
(1) The empty list handling needs attention. Should return [] as advertised ("Return list"). Code should be simply if not seq: return []. (2) Testing scheme in loop is sub-optimal: on average in random lists, condition val < maxval will be the most common but the above code takes 2 tests instead of one. –  John Machin Oct 21 '10 at 21:44
    
+1 to @John Machin's comment for catching the inconsistency with the docstring and not letting me get away with posting sub-optimal code. To be truthful, since an answer was already accepted, I lost a bit of motivation to continue working on my answer, since I assumed hardly anyone further would even look at it -- and it's so much longer than everyone else's. –  martineau Oct 21 '10 at 22:55
    
@martineau: "accepted" answers are not necessarily "acceptable". I generally read all answers. Including your revision. Which does 3 tests now in the rare case of == instead of 2 -- your elif condition will always be true. –  John Machin Oct 21 '10 at 23:21
    
@John Machin: I got really inspired and revised it even further. Now it's down minimumal additional tests, plus a few other tweaks. Thanks for your comments and constructive criticisms. I caught the always True elif myself, FWIW. ;-) –  martineau Oct 21 '10 at 23:55
1  
@martineau: See my answer. –  John Machin Oct 22 '10 at 1:30
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I can't reproduce the @SilentGhost-beating performance quoted by @martineau. Here's my effort with comparisons:

=== maxelements.py ===

a = [32, 37, 28, 30, 37, 25, 27, 24, 35, 55, 23, 31, 55, 21, 40, 18, 50,
             35, 41, 49, 37, 19, 40, 41, 31]
b = range(10000)
c = range(10000 - 1, -1, -1)
d = b + c

def maxelements_s(seq): # @SilentGhost
    ''' Return list of position(s) of largest element '''
    m = max(seq)
    return [i for i, j in enumerate(seq) if j == m]

def maxelements_m(seq): # @martineau
    ''' Return list of position(s) of largest element '''
    max_indices = []
    if len(seq):
        max_val = seq[0]
        for i, val in ((i, val) for i, val in enumerate(seq) if val >= max_val):
            if val == max_val:
                max_indices.append(i)
            else:
                max_val = val
                max_indices = [i]
    return max_indices

def maxelements_j(seq): # @John Machin
    ''' Return list of position(s) of largest element '''
    if not seq: return []
    max_val = seq[0] if seq[0] >= seq[-1] else seq[-1]
    max_indices = []
    for i, val in enumerate(seq):
        if val < max_val: continue
        if val == max_val:
            max_indices.append(i)
        else:
            max_val = val
            max_indices = [i]
    return max_indices

Results from a beat-up old laptop running Python 2.7 on Windows XP SP3:

>\python27\python -mtimeit -s"import maxelements as me" "me.maxelements_s(me.a)"
100000 loops, best of 3: 6.88 usec per loop

>\python27\python -mtimeit -s"import maxelements as me" "me.maxelements_m(me.a)"
100000 loops, best of 3: 11.1 usec per loop

>\python27\python -mtimeit -s"import maxelements as me" "me.maxelements_j(me.a)"
100000 loops, best of 3: 8.51 usec per loop

>\python27\python -mtimeit -s"import maxelements as me;a100=me.a*100" "me.maxelements_s(a100)"
1000 loops, best of 3: 535 usec per loop

>\python27\python -mtimeit -s"import maxelements as me;a100=me.a*100" "me.maxelements_m(a100)"
1000 loops, best of 3: 558 usec per loop

>\python27\python -mtimeit -s"import maxelements as me;a100=me.a*100" "me.maxelements_j(a100)"
1000 loops, best of 3: 489 usec per loop
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Here is the max value and the indexes it appears at:

>>> from collections import defaultdict
>>> d = defaultdict(list)
>>> a = [32, 37, 28, 30, 37, 25, 27, 24, 35, 55, 23, 31, 55, 21, 40, 18, 50, 35, 41, 49, 37, 19, 40, 41, 31]
>>> for i, x in enumerate(a):
...     d[x].append(i)
... 
>>> k = max(d.keys())
>>> print k, d[k]
55 [9, 12]

Later: for the satisfaction of @SilentGhost

>>> from itertools import takewhile
>>> import heapq
>>> 
>>> def popper(heap):
...     while heap:
...         yield heapq.heappop(heap)
... 
>>> a = [32, 37, 28, 30, 37, 25, 27, 24, 35, 55, 23, 31, 55, 21, 40, 18, 50, 35, 41, 49, 37, 19, 40, 41, 31]
>>> h = [(-x, i) for i, x in enumerate(a)]
>>> heapq.heapify(h)
>>> 
>>> largest = heapq.heappop(h)
>>> indexes = [largest[1]] + [x[1] for x in takewhile(lambda large: large[0] == largest[0], popper(h))]
>>> print -largest[0], indexes
55 [9, 12]
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you do realise how inefficient this is? –  SilentGhost Oct 21 '10 at 16:44
1  
Rationalizations: (1) "Premature optimization is the ... etc." (2) It probably doesn't matter. (3) It's still a good solution. Maybe I'll recode it to use heapq -- finding the max there would be trivial. –  hughdbrown Oct 21 '10 at 17:02
    
while I'd love to see your heapq solution, I doubt it would work. –  SilentGhost Oct 21 '10 at 17:18
    
@silentGhost: It works! –  hughdbrown Oct 21 '10 at 17:35
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import operator

def max_positions(iterable, key=None, reverse=False):
  if key is None:
    def key(x):
      return x
  if reverse:
    better = operator.lt
  else:
    better = operator.gt

  it = enumerate(iterable)
  for pos, item in it:
    break
  else:
    raise ValueError("max_positions: empty iterable")
    # note this is the same exception type raised by max([])
  cur_max = key(item)
  cur_pos = [pos]

  for pos, item in it:
    k = key(item)
    if better(k, cur_max):
      cur_max = k
      cur_pos = [pos]
    elif k == cur_max:
      cur_pos.append(pos)

  return cur_max, cur_pos

def min_positions(iterable, key=None, reverse=False):
  return max_positions(iterable, key, not reverse)

>>> L = range(10) * 2
>>> L
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
>>> max_positions(L)
(9, [9, 19])
>>> min_positions(L)
(0, [0, 10])
>>> max_positions(L, key=lambda x: x // 2, reverse=True)
(0, [0, 1, 10, 11])
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Similar idea with a list comprehension but without enumerate

m = max(a)
[i for i in range(len(a)) if a[i] == m]
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