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Is there a way to detect the number of arguments a function in a class has?

What I want to do is the following.

$class = 'foo';
$path = 'path/to/file';
if ( ! file_exists($path)) {
  die();
}

require($path);

if ( ! class_exists($class)) {
  die();
}

$c = new class;

if (num_function_args($class, $function) == count($url_segments)) {
  $c->$function($one, $two, $three);
}

Is this possible?

share|improve this question
    
not sure. you can however, at your class definition, use something like func_get_arg() [php.net/manual/en/function.func-get-arg.php] and according to arguments received, do different things.. – acm Oct 21 '10 at 15:40
1  
You should consider an alternative design. Could you provide more context to your problem? – erisco Oct 21 '10 at 15:41
1  
Please clearify whether you want to know the number of arguments passed to a function at runtime, e.g. fn(1,1,1) (3 arguments) or the number of arguments given in the signature, e.g. function fn($a,$b$c=0,$d=0) (4 arguments, 2 required, 2 optional) – Gordon Oct 21 '10 at 15:59
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using reflection, but this is really an overhead in your code; and a method can have any number of arguments without their explicitly being defined in the method definition.

$classMethod = new ReflectionMethod($class,$method);
$argumentCount = count($classMethod->getParameters());
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think I will use it but thanks for the answer. – JasonS Oct 26 '10 at 10:36
    
While reflection methods in most languages tend to cost a larger number of CPU cycles, I'm using this exact method and I don't see any difference in execution time with or without. – Cypher Mar 19 '14 at 17:55
    
@Cypher After 2 1/2 years of improvement in PHP since this answer was posted, Reflection has improved significantly – Mark Baker Mar 19 '14 at 19:21

To get the number of arguments in a Function or Method signature, you can use

Example

$rf = new ReflectionMethod('DateTime', 'diff');
echo $rf->getNumberOfParameters();         // 2
echo $rf->getNumberOfRequiredParameters(); // 1

To get the number of arguments passed to a function at runtime, you can use

  • func_num_args — Returns the number of arguments passed to the function

Example

function fn() {
    return func_num_args();
}
echo fn(1,2,3,4,5,6,7); // 7
share|improve this answer

Use call_user_func_array instead, if you pass too many parameters, they will simply be ignored.

Demo

class Foo {
   public function bar($arg1, $arg2) {
       echo $arg1 . ', ' . $arg2;
   }
}


$foo = new Foo();

call_user_func_array(array($foo, 'bar'), array(1, 2, 3, 4, 5));

Will output

1, 2

For dynamic arguments, use func_get_args like this :

class Foo {
   public function bar() {
       $args = func_get_args();
       echo implode(', ', $args);
   }
}


$foo = new Foo();

call_user_func_array(array($foo, 'bar'), array(1, 2, 3, 4, 5));

Will output

1, 2, 3, 4, 5
share|improve this answer
    
A warning is also thrown, and passing too many arguments using call_user_func_array to certain functions (like is_numeric) will actually change the behaviour of that function. – Brian Hogg Jan 19 at 16:40
    
@BrianHogg of course. Since arguments passed to functions are pushed to the stack, if the stack is full, you'll get weird behaviors. If this ever becomes your case, you problem is not the function's behaviors :) Use a single array arg in that case, for example. – Yanick Rochon Jan 19 at 16:56
    
there was a recent issue with a popular CMS where a validation/filter function was calling is_numeric with 3 parameters (the value plus details on the request), but instead of is_numeric looking at the first argument and ignoring others it returns NULL and the validation falls through. Don't think that's a stack overflow (ha ha) issue but rather the other parameters affecting the function's output rather than simply being ignored. – Brian Hogg Jan 19 at 20:53

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