Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why is this acceptable:

type SomeClass<'T> =
    val mutable id : int
    val mutable result : 'T

But this is not:

type SomeIface = 
    abstract id : int

type SomeClass<'T> = 
    interface SomeIface with
        val mutable id : int
        val mutable result : 'T

The compiler complains about my use of 'val' telling me to use 'member' but then I can't use mutable.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Desco's answer is correct. As for why your approach doesn't work, the key is that in F#, when you have something like

interface Iface with
   [indented lines here]

the indented lines can only contain implementations of the interface's members. They should not contain additional fields or members of the type which you are defining (such as the two mutable fields in your case). Therefore desco's answer works, as does something like the following:

type SomeIface = 
    abstract id : int

type SomeClass<'T> = 
    interface SomeIface with
        member this.id = this.id
    val mutable id : int
    val mutable result : 'T
share|improve this answer

move fields above interface implementation

type SomeIface = 
    abstract id : int

type SomeClass<'T>() = 
    [<DefaultValue>]
    val mutable id : int
    [<DefaultValue>]
    val mutable result : 'T
    interface SomeIface with
        member this.id = this.id

let x = SomeClass<int>(id = 10)
let y : SomeIface = upcast x
printfn "%d" y.id
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.