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Which types of classes can use foreach loops?

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5  
You may want to choose a different accepted answer, since the one you selected isn't really representative of the correct answer. –  George Stocker Dec 30 '08 at 2:02

4 Answers 4

Actually, strictly speaking, all you need to use foreach is a public GetEnumerator() method that returns something with a bool MoveNext() method and a ? Current {get;} property. However, the most common meaning of this is "something that implements IEnumerable/IEnumerable<T>, returning an IEnumerator/IEnumerator<T>.

By implication, this includes anything that implements ICollection/ICollection<T>, such as anything like Collection<T>, List<T>, arrays (T[]), etc. So any standard "collection of data" will generally support foreach.

For proof of the first point, the following works just fine:

using System;
class Foo {
    public int Current { get; private set; }
    private int step;
    public bool MoveNext() {
        if (step >= 5) return false;
        Current = step++;
        return true;
    }
}
class Bar {
    public Foo GetEnumerator() { return new Foo(); }
}
static class Program {
    static void Main() {
        Bar bar = new Bar();
        foreach (int item in bar) {
            Console.WriteLine(item);
        }
    }
}

How does it work?

A foreach loop like foreach(int i in obj) {...} kinda equates to:

var tmp = obj.GetEnumerator();
int i; // up to C# 4.0
while(tmp.MoveNext()) {
    int i; // C# 5.0
    i = tmp.Current;
    {...} // your code
}

However, there are variations. For example, it the enumerator (tmp) supports IDisposable, it is used too (similar to using).

Note the difference in the placement of the declaration "int i" inside (C# 5.0) vs. outside (up C# 4.0) the loop. It's important if you use i in an anonymous method/lambda inside your code-block. But that is another story ;-p

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1  
+1 for going in depth. I normally don't go that in depth for a question that may be a 'beginner' question since it would seem overwhelming to the new programmer. –  George Stocker Dec 29 '08 at 23:05
    
True, Gortok - so I followed up with the stuff about lists/arrays/etc. –  Marc Gravell Dec 29 '08 at 23:06
    
Would be good to mention the implicit runtime casting to the loop variable - can produce type incompatibility exceptions. –  Daniel Earwicker Jul 11 '09 at 6:58
    
Shouldn't the first line inside the while loop be i = tmp.Current;? –  Jason Jan 27 '10 at 2:55
2  
Don't forget: When using a array with foreach the compiler creates a simple for-loop( You can see this when working with IL ). –  Felix K. May 14 '12 at 13:00

From MSDN:

The foreach statement repeats a group of embedded statements for each element in an array or an object collection. The foreach statement is used to iterate through the collection to get the desired information, but should not be used to change the contents of the collection to avoid unpredictable side effects. (emphasis mine)

So, if you have an array, you could use the foreach statement to iterate through the array, like so:

 int[] fibarray = new int[] { 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13 };
    foreach (int i in fibarray)
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine(i);
    }

You could also use it to iterate through a List<T> collection, like so:

List<string> list = new List<string>();

foreach (string item in list)
{
    Console.WriteLine(item);
}
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1  
oddly enough, according to MSDN (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/9yb8xew9(VS.80).aspx), objects types don't need to implement IEnumerable. Any type that defines GetEnumerator, MoveNext, Reset and Current the correct way will work. Weird, huh? –  Sean Reilly Dec 29 '08 at 23:01
    
Neat. I didn't know that. :-) –  George Stocker Dec 29 '08 at 23:02

According to the blog post Duck Notation, duck typing is used.

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Here's the docs: Main article With Arrays With Collection Objects

It's important to note that "The type of the collection element must be convertible to the identifier type". This sometimes cannot be checked at compile time and can generate a runtime exception if the instance type is not assignable to the reference type.

This will generate a runtime exception if there is an non-Apple in the fruit basket, such as an orange.

List<Fruit> fruitBasket = new List<Fruit>() { new Apple(), new Orange() };
foreach(Apple a in fruitBasket)

This safely filters the list to only the Apples using Enumerable.OfType

foreach(Apple a in fruitBasket.OfType<Apple>() )
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