Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to understand better how data binding works in .net. I was checking this article, and I came up with this code:

public partial class Form1 : Form//, INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler MyTextChanged;

    [System.ComponentModel.Bindable(true)]
    public string MyText
    {
        get { return textBox1.Text; }
        set 
        {
            textBox1.Text = value;
            if (MyTextChanged != null)
                MyTextChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("MyText"));
        }
    }

    MyClass myClass { get; set; }

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        myClass = new MyClass();
        Binding binding = new Binding("MyText", myClass, "Dic");
        binding.Parse += new ConvertEventHandler(binding_Parse);
        binding.Format += new ConvertEventHandler(binding_Format);
        DataBindings.Add(binding);
        myClass.AddStuff("uno", "UNO");
    }

    void OnMyTextChanged(PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (MyTextChanged != null) MyTextChanged(this, e);
    }

    void binding_Format(object sender, ConvertEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.Value is Dictionary<string, string>)
        {
            Dictionary<string, string> source = (Dictionary<string, string>)e.Value;
            e.Value = source.Count.ToString();
        }
    }

    void binding_Parse(object sender, ConvertEventArgs e)
    {
        MessageBox.Show(e.DesiredType.ToString());
    }

    private void changemyClassButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        myClass.AddStuff(myClass.Dic.Count.ToString(), "'" + myClass.Dic.Count.ToString() + "'");
    }

    private void changeMyTextButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        MyText = "1234";
    }
}

public class MyClass : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    public Dictionary<string, string> Dic { get; set; }

    public MyClass()
    {
        Dic = new Dictionary<string, string>();
    }

    public void AddStuff(string key, string value)
    {
        Dic.Add(key, value);
        if (PropertyChanged != null) PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Dic"));
    }
}

I'm trying to bind MyText to myClass. The problem is that the function binding_Parse is never being called. I know I could probably bind textBox1.Text directly to myClass, or that there might be a thousand other possible ways to do what I'm trying to do, but this is just a practice; I'm trying to understand better data binding. So I want to bind a custom object to a custom property so I can see the process from end to end. The custom object is myClass, and the custom property is MyText. I've tried all kinds of variations, like implementing INotifyPropertyChanged, but I can't get binding_Parse to be called (I would expect it to be called when I call changeMyTextButton_Click). Am I missing something?

Edit: To put it simpler: I want to write a user control with a property string MyText that then a user can bind to something else, the same way you can bind a TextBox's Text property to something else. So I don't want to bind to the property of a control to an object, I want to write a control with a property that then a user can bind to an object.

share|improve this question
    
what do you intend to do? update textbox content with MyText property? or force binding_parse to be executed? –  Junior Mayhe Oct 21 '10 at 20:27
    
I want to bind MyText to myClass.Dic, so that whenever MyText changes, myClass.Dic changes (to start with I want binding_Parse to get called, since there is where I would set the new value for MyText), and whenever myClass.Dic changes, MyText changes (this already works). I choosed to set MyText to myClass.Dic.Count.ToString() when myClass.Dic changes for no particular reason. I just want to see any change on one reflected on another. I found [this][1] article, but it's for WFP. I can't find one for Windows Forms. [1]: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms752347.aspx –  Juan Oct 21 '10 at 20:39
    
Another example would be to bind string str1 to string str2 so that whenever str1 changes, str2 is set to str1 backwards, and whenever str2 changes, str1 is set to str2 backwards. All by using standard .net data binding. This would force me to use Format and Parse, and I could finally see how the whole data binding cycle works. –  Juan Oct 21 '10 at 20:44
    
Just edited my question. Hope is clearer now. –  Juan Oct 21 '10 at 20:52

2 Answers 2

Perhaps this will help you out, understanding when Parse event is executed.

To see binding_Parse working check out this sample:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{

    public MyClass myClass { get; set; }

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        myClass = new MyClass();
        myClass.AddStuff("uno", "UNO");

        Binding b = new Binding("Text", myClass, "Dic");
        b.Parse += new ConvertEventHandler(b_Parse);
        b.Format += new ConvertEventHandler(b_Format);
        textBox1.DataBindings.Add(b);
    }

    void b_Format(object sender, ConvertEventArgs e)
    {
        e.Value = (e.Value as Dictionary<string, string>)["uno"].ToString();
        textBox1.Text = e.Value.ToString();
    }

    void b_Parse(object sender, ConvertEventArgs e)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("This is executed when you lost focus\n\nI'm parsing your entered text: " + e.Value);
    }


}

You just have debug. Click on the button, and notice Format event is called first. Then if you manually change textbox1.Text value, when you click on the button again, there will be a lost focus, and then Parse event will be executed.

To create your custom control also check this site.

share|improve this answer
    
Please see my edit. I apologize for the confusion. Hope you can still help me. –  Juan Oct 21 '10 at 20:55
    
Ok did you see the site I told you? –  Junior Mayhe Oct 21 '10 at 22:39
    
I did but I couldn't find anything about binding properties; they use events instead. –  Juan Oct 22 '10 at 3:43
up vote 1 down vote accepted

OK I figured it out in case anyone had the same problem. I had to create an event handler named MyTextChanged to let the Binding knows MyText is changing, and set the Bindings DataSourceUpdateMode property to OnPropertyChanged. Using this simple principle I can bind a pixel in my screen to the rest of the universe :). Here's the code:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public event EventHandler MyTextChanged;

    [Bindable(true)]
    public string MyText
    {
        get { return textBox1.Text; }
        set 
        {
            if (textBox1.Text != value)
            {
                textBox1.Text = value;
                OnMyTextChanged();
            }
        }
    }

    MyClass myClass { get; set; }

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        myClass = new MyClass();
        Binding binding = new Binding("MyText", myClass, "Dic");
        binding.DataSourceUpdateMode = DataSourceUpdateMode.OnPropertyChanged;
        binding.Parse += new ConvertEventHandler(binding_Parse);
        binding.Format += new ConvertEventHandler(binding_Format);
        DataBindings.Add(binding);
        myClass.AddStuff("uno", "UNO");
    }

    void OnMyTextChanged()
    {
        if (MyTextChanged != null) MyTextChanged(this, EventArgs.Empty);
    }

    void binding_Format(object sender, ConvertEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.Value is Dictionary<string, string>)
        {
            Dictionary<string, string> source = (Dictionary<string, string>)e.Value;
            e.Value = source.Count.ToString();
        }
    }

    void binding_Parse(object sender, ConvertEventArgs e)
    {
        MessageBox.Show(e.DesiredType.ToString());

    }

    private void changemyClassButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        myClass.AddStuff(myClass.Dic.Count.ToString(), "'" + myClass.Dic.Count.ToString() + "'");
    }

    private void changeMyTextButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        MyText = "1234";
    }
}

public class MyClass : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    public Dictionary<string, string> Dic { get; set; }

    public MyClass()
    {
        Dic = new Dictionary<string, string>();
    }

    public void AddStuff(string key, string value)
    {
        Dic.Add(key, value);
        if (PropertyChanged != null) PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Dic"));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What I still don't understand is why is this not causing and infinite recursion. I guess there is some internal mechanism to prevent that. –  Juan Oct 22 '10 at 6:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.