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Question: i want to split two classes out to their own file, while avoiding circular references.

i have a unit with some classes (and some enumerations and constants). Anyone will recognize Click and Clack the tappet brothers:

unit Cartalk;

interface

type
   TSolution = (solTransmission, solBrakes, solGremlins);

   TTappetBrother = class(TObject)
   public
      function GetSolution: TSolution; virtual; abstract;
   end;

   TClick = class(TTappetBrother)
   public      
      function GetSolution: TSolution; override;
   end;

   TClack = class(TTapperBrother)
   public
      function GetSolution: TSolution; override;
   end;

implementation

function TClick.GetSolution: TSolution;
begin
   Result := solTransmission;
end;

function TClack.GetSoltution: TSolution;
begin
   Result := solGremlins;
end;

end.

Now obviously my two classes TClick and TClick are quite complex. For manageability i'd like to split TClick and TClack out to their own units while not breaking any existing external code.

My first crack at it would be:

unit Cartalk;

interface

uses
   Cartalk_Click, Cartalk_Clack;

type
   TSolution = (solTransmission, solBrakes, solGremlins);

   TTappetBrother = class(TObject)
   public
      function GetSolution: TSolution; virtual; abstract;
   end;

   TClick = Cartalk_Click.TClick; //alias brought in from Cartalk_Click.pas

   TClack = Cartalk_Clack.TClack; //alias brought in from Cartalk_Clack.pas

 implementation

 end.

Perfect, i have all the same classes available in Cartalk.pas, now i just have to write Cartalk_Click.pas and Cartalk_Clack.pas:

unit Cartalk_Click;

interface

type
   TClick = class(TTappetBrother)
   public      
      function GetSolution: TSolution; override;
   end;

implementation

function TClick.GetSolution: TSolution;
begin
   Result := solTransmission;
end;

end.

Problem, of course, is that TTappetBrother and TSolution are not declared in this unit. So we add a reference to where they live to the uses, watch it fail, and reach the heart of my question:

unit Cartalk_Click;

interface

uses
   Cartalk;

type
   TClick = class(TTappetBrother)
   public      
      function GetSolution: TSolution; override;
   end;

implementation

function TClick.GetSolution: TSolution;
begin
   Result := solTransmission;
end;

end.

There is now a circular reference between Cartalk and Cartalk_Click.

Note: Of course i don't have a Cartalk unit, with Click and Clack the tapper brothers - this is just an example. In reality i have 3 classes, 20 enumerations, and 293 constants in my unit.

share|improve this question
    
"Tappet" (eg "tap it") Brothers. Just sayin' –  Larry Lustig Oct 21 '10 at 20:12
    
Edit: Fixed one typo of tappet. –  Ian Boyd Oct 21 '10 at 20:21
1  
Adding a unit to the uses clause in every unit in a few projects is too difficult? –  Andreas Rejbrand Oct 21 '10 at 20:33
    
@Andreas Rejbrand: Yes. If you can't accept my question as valid: a terrorist has taken my wife hostage, and will kill her if i cannot split TClick and TClack to a separate unit without breaking existing code. –  Ian Boyd Oct 24 '10 at 11:37
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1 Answer 1

Write a unit:

unit Tappet;

interface

type
   TSolution = (solTransmission, solBrakes, solGremlins);

   TTappetBrother = class(TObject)
   public
      function GetSolution: TSolution; virtual; abstract;
   end;

implementation

end.

and use it in the Click and the Clack units. Then write the CarTalk unit to use all three and export the needed types in its interface. No circular references needed.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the solution, I think. By "export the needed types", I assume you mean like TClick = class(Click.TClick); ? –  Andreas Rejbrand Oct 21 '10 at 21:20
    
More or less. You don't need the class keyword. It is just aliasing as done in the question. –  Muhammad Alkarouri Oct 21 '10 at 21:32
    
How do you export constants? –  Ian Boyd Oct 24 '10 at 11:40
1  
@Ian Boyd: Like the VCL does. For instance, TPoint is defined in Types.pas (which you seldom see in your uses clause), but in Windows.pas (which is almost always in this clause), you "export" it: type TPoint = Types.TPoint; (And, yes, const works like type in this respect.) –  Andreas Rejbrand Oct 24 '10 at 12:49
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