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I am stuck with this following problem. Say, I have a request which has 1000 items, and I would like to utilize Java Executor to resolve this.

Here is the main method

public static void main(String[] args) {

     //Assume that I have request object that contain arrayList of names
     //and VectorList is container for each request result

     ExecutorService threadExecutor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(3);
     Vector<Result> vectorList = new Vector<Result();

     for (int i=0;i<request.size();i++) {
          threadExecutor.execute(new QueryTask(request.get(i).getNames, vectorList)
     }

      threadExecutor.shutdown();

      response.setResult(vectorList)

}

And here is the QueryTask class

public QueryTask() implements Runnable {

    private String names;
    private Vector<Result> vectorList;

    public QueryTask(String names, Vector<Result> vectorList) {
          this.names = names;
          this.vectorList = vectorList;
    }

    public void run() {
         // do something with names, for example, query database
         Result result = process names;

         //add result to vectorList
         vectorList.add(result);
    }


}

So, based on the example above, I want to make thread pool for each data I have in the request, run it simultaneously, and add result to VectorList. And at the end of the process, I want to have all the result already in the Vector list.

I keep getting inconsistent result in the response. For example, if I pass request with 10 names, I am getting back only 3 or 4, or sometimes nothing in the response. I was expecting if I pass 10, then I will get 10 back.

Does anyone know whats causing the problem?

Any help will be appreciate it.

Thanks

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The easy solution is to add a call to ExecutorService.awaitTermination()

public static void main(String[] args) {

     //Assume that I have request object that contain arrayList of names
     //and VectorList is container for each request result

     ExecutorService threadExecutor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(3);
     Vector<Result> vectorList = new Vector<Result();

     for (int i=0;i<request.size();i++) {
          threadExecutor.execute(new QueryTask(request.get(i).getNames, vectorList)
     }

      threadExecutor.shutdown();
      threadExecutor.awaitTermination(aReallyLongTime,TimeUnit.SECONDS);

      response.setResult(vectorList)

}
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Actually that was the culprit. I added awaitTermination per Tim suggestion, and it does work now. Thank you! –  javaWorker Oct 22 '10 at 14:46
    
The whole process itself already fast. Say about 1 second for 1000 items, but I was just being greedy and try to make it even faster. When I implement this multithreading approach, it seems result is not much different from single thread since there is awaitTermination call. Is there any tips of using this awaitTermination to make my process faster? –  javaWorker Oct 22 '10 at 14:49
    
It may be slighty faster to use ExecutorService.submit(Callable) and iterate over the returned Future objects as @John Guaghan suggests, but do NOT call awaitTermination, it is unnecessary. You might also want to read about Map-Reduce which is essentially what you are doing here. –  Tim Bender Oct 22 '10 at 20:03
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You need to replace threadExecutor.shutdown(); with threadExecutor.awaitTermination();. After calling threadExecutor.shutdown(), you need to also call threadExecutor.awaitTermination(). The former is a nonblocking call that merely initiates a shutdown whereas the latter is a blocking call that actually waits for all tasks to finish. Since you are using the former, you are probably returning before all tasks have finished, which is why you don't always get back all of your results. The Java API isn't too clear, so someone filed a bug about this.

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Wrong, the OP needs both calls. –  Tim Bender Oct 21 '10 at 23:47
    
Looks like you are right: both shutdown() and awaitTermination() are necessary. The JavaDoc page (download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/…) does not make this too obvious and the methods are pretty poorly named, but the code examples at the top include a shutdownAndAwaitTermination() method that helps clear things up. –  Yevgeniy Brikman Oct 21 '10 at 23:59
    
yup, if you edit your answer I'll swap my vote :) –  Tim Bender Oct 22 '10 at 20:09
    
@Tim Edited the original post. –  Yevgeniy Brikman Oct 22 '10 at 20:23
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There are at least 2 issues here.

  1. In your main, you shut down the ExecutorService, then try to get the results out right away. The executor service will execute your jobs asychronously, so there is a very good chance that all of your jobs are not done yet. When you call response.setResult(vectorList), vectorList is not fully populated.

2. You are concurrently accessing the same Vector object from within all of your runnables. This is likely to cause ConcurrentModificationExceptions, or just clobber stuff in the vector. You need to either manually synchronize on the vector inside of QueryTask, or pass in a thread-safe container instead, like Collections.synchronizedList( new ArrayList() );

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point 2 should not happen as vectors are thread safe –  Steven Oct 21 '10 at 22:23
    
@Steven - thanks. I was thinking of Lists in general, I forget about Vector (I personally never use the class). How it is being used here is okay, but if the QueryTask was doing something more complex than just adding to it (ie, iterating over it) you would still need some additional concurrency control here, even though Vector is synchronized. –  wolfcastle Oct 21 '10 at 22:46
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