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I'm writing an app that will offer OCR of an image captured by the iPhone camera. I want to test the image before I perform the OCR analysis to see if there is sufficient lighting. Anyone have any ideas?

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might be a bit tough, first thoughts are to iterate over every pixel and calculate the Lightness value, then generate some stats like "darkest area", "lightest area", "overall lightness", etc. –  drudge Oct 21 '10 at 23:35
    
Instead of a simple measure of lighting, you probably need to set some rules on contrast for the image as well. Converting to grayscale and computing the histogram of lightness values will give you a good start. From there, you can use the standard deviation, skewness, and other measures to determine if an image likely meets your criteria. –  warrenm Oct 22 '10 at 0:00
    
@warrenm: usually it's cheaper to compute separate histograms for each channel then to convert to grayscale and compute one histogram. –  rpetrich Oct 22 '10 at 18:28
    
Apparently doing image analysis on an iphone is a bit of a challenge. The uncompressed image that's returned by the camera is ~8mb (it's a UIImage object) and to work with it, you have to make a copy (Since UIImage is immutable) - thus requiring ~16mb of memory. :/ –  Casey Flynn Oct 25 '10 at 22:46

1 Answer 1

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The most flexible way is to generate a histogram for the red green and blue color channels, and then use it to determine the average lightness, median lightness, black/white points, contrast or other custom functions.

Use CGBitmapContextCreate to create a bitmap context backed by a buffer of your creation, draw your image into it, then loop through each pixel in the buffer to populate the histograms.

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