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I find myself doing this a lot:

window.onload = function(){

   $.get("http://example.com/example.html", function(data) {
       $('#contentHere').html(data);

       setTimeout("javaScriptClass.init()", 200);
   });

}

But setTimeout seems a bit hacky (and 200ms is already over three times the attention span of the average user :). What's the best alternative?

EDIT

javaScriptClass.init() acts on DOM objects from what is loaded in the ajax call

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1  
Why do you have a delay at all? –  Nick Craver Oct 22 '10 at 1:31
    
@Nick! javaScriptClass.init() acts on DOM objects from what is loaded in the ajax call –  Emile Oct 22 '10 at 1:34
1  
They'll be loaded immediately after the line before with the .html() call, it's a synchronous operation. –  Nick Craver Oct 22 '10 at 1:37
    
@Nick I'm toggling back and forth between javaScriptClass.init() and setTimeout("javaScriptClass.init()", 200); and getting different results. With the delay it works and without it doesn't. Should I reframe the question then? –  Emile Oct 22 '10 at 1:41
    
Are you loading images in the content, and those are needed? That's the only scenario I can picture not being completely synchronous here. –  Nick Craver Oct 22 '10 at 1:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think there's some confusion here about the load, you can just do this:

window.onload = function(){    
   $.get("http://example.com/example.html", function(data) {
       $('#contentHere').html(data);
       javaScriptClass.init();
   });    
}

After the $('#contentHere').html(data); the DOM elements will be there ready to use. Also take a look at .load() for attachment (in case other onload handlers may need to attach), like this:

$(window).load(function(){    
   $.get("http://example.com/example.html", function(data) {
       $('#contentHere').html(data);
       javaScriptClass.init();
   });    
});

Though, unless you're waiting on images, this can be called in a document.ready handler and fire sooner, resulting in a better user experience.

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Thanks Nick. I'm befuddled but this is obviously the right answer. –  Emile Oct 22 '10 at 5:17

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