Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any alternative way to recursion? The classs i am dealing are as follows TibrvMsg This is message class which contains fields of type TirvMsgField TibrvMsg can also contain TirvMsgField of type TibrvMsg.That means message can contain fields which are message themselves. I can use recursion to print all the fields.But i want to modify fields and add the to another Message. I am wondering if there is any alternative way to recursion?

import com.tibco.tibrv.*; 

public class ShowMsg { 

static TibrvMsg modMsg =new TibrvMsg(); 
static int id = 0; 
public static void main(String[] args) throws TibrvException{ 

    TibrvMsg msg = getMsg(); 
    TibrvMsg modMsg = getModMsg(msg); 
    //System.out.println(modMsg); 
    for(int i=0;i<modMsg.getNumFields();i++){ 
        TibrvMsgField field = modMsg.getFieldByIndex(i); 
        System.out.println(field.name+"-------"+field.id); 
    } 


} 

public static TibrvMsg getMsg(){ 
    TibrvMsg msg = new TibrvMsg(); 
    try{ 
    TibrvMsg subMsg = new TibrvMsg(); 
    subMsg.add("S1","43333"); 
    subMsg.add("S2","7377773"); 
    subMsg.add("S3","8388883"); 
    //subMsg.add("SUBSUB", subSubMsg); 

    msg.add("Field1", "JJSJJS"); 
    msg.add("Field2", "JDSKJKS"); 
    msg.add("Field3", "9299399"); 
    msg.add("Field4", "HHJJSJJSJ"); 
    msg.add("SUB",subMsg); 
    } 
    catch(TibrvException rv){ 
        System.out.println(rv); 
    } 
    return msg; 
} 



public static TibrvMsg getModMsg(TibrvMsg msg){ 

    try{ 
        int total = msg.getNumFields(); 

        for(int i=0;i<total;i++){ 
        TibrvMsgField field = msg.getFieldByIndex(i); 
        if(field.type==TibrvMsg.MSG){ 
             getModMsg((TibrvMsg)field.data); 
        } 
        else{ 

            field.id = id++; 
            msg.updateField(field); 

        } 

    } 
    } 
    catch(TibrvException rv){ 
    System.out.println(rv);  
    } 

    return msg; 

} 

} The method getMsg() returns sample message.In getModMsg() i m using recursion and it works, that means i am able to print each and every field and subfield. Now in this method, i want to modify the field properties and update the message.Means method should return the modified message.Hence i m using :

field.id = id++; msg.updateField(field); This is not working.What i want now is to create a modified message using above functions.

share|improve this question
1  
It's difficult to understand what you're asking, perhaps you could make this more concrete by posting small excerpts from the class(es) in question. –  Mark Elliot Oct 22 '10 at 3:05
1  
Could you rephrase this question? As-is, it is not clear what you are asking. –  Michael Aaron Safyan Oct 22 '10 at 3:07
    
@user419229: I've added the recursion tag, since that's obviously relevant to what the question is about (moreso than Java, really). As others have said, please re-phrase the question to make it clearer what you're asking. That should improve the quality of the answers. –  GreenMatt Oct 22 '10 at 3:28
    
Dude, give us a minimal definition of these two classes. –  dsmith Oct 22 '10 at 3:33
add comment

closed as not a real question by Jacob Relkin, Michael Aaron Safyan, EJP, Nathan Hughes, Graviton Oct 23 '10 at 7:45

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5 Answers

There is direct recursion where a method calls itself and indirect recursion where a method calls another method that somewhere down the line will call the original method. There isn't really any "alternative way to recursion" as recursion is just a concept.

share|improve this answer
1  
Never heard the terms "direct" and "indirect" recursion before. I'm accustom to "recursive" functions and "mutually recursive" functions. –  Stephen Swensen Oct 22 '10 at 14:40
    
"Direct" and "indirect" is the terminology I was taught, and it's also the terminology that Wikipedia uses, and as we all know, Wikipedia is the irrefutable source of everything factual: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  KPthunder Oct 23 '10 at 19:15
add comment

I am still not understanding why you can't use recursion. But here is an idea. Almost anything written in recursion can be written using a stack and a loop. It can become really confusing using a loop but it will get that non-recursion. Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can always use loops to do what you would do with recursion (otherwise languages which don't support recursion would not be able to do things certain things).

share|improve this answer
    
To clarify, when you refer to languages that don't support recursion, you mean that they don't have tail-call optimisation. Clearly you can recurs in Java, but deep recursion can cause the call stack to grow. This is a limitation of the JVM and it's a limitation I truly wish they would address. If not for the sake of Java, for other languages such as Scala and Clojure. –  dsmith Oct 22 '10 at 3:25
    
@dsmith There are some TC language which don't support recursion :-) Although (esp. now) rare, one example is PEARL. –  user166390 Oct 22 '10 at 3:50
    
dsmith: I think he means languages, like FORTRAN 77, that don't support recursion. In FORTRAN 77 it's a compiler error for a function to call itself, and since local variables are usually statically allocated (as opposed to stack allocated like in C), recursion is generally useless anyway. –  Gabe Oct 22 '10 at 3:52
    
Yes, I mean languages which don't support recursion such as FORTRAN 77. –  GreenMatt Oct 22 '10 at 3:58
    
Fair enough. I haven't written a line of FORTRAN since the late 80's and even then I wasn't doing anything real :-). –  dsmith Oct 22 '10 at 4:36
show 1 more comment

Your code modifies the field id as expected, the problem when you call updateField the action is on the chained message. What you need is to maintain the root or top message reference so you can add the fields to it.

private static class Context {
    private int sequence ; // to avoid using the static var id (Thread-Safety)
    private TibrvMsg head ; // The message we want to receive the childs data
    private TibrvMsg current ; // Message to work in the level of recursion
}

public static TibrvMsg getModMsg(TibrvMsg message) {
    Context context = new Context() ;
    context.sequence = 0;
    context.head = message ; // can be a new message ;)
    context.current = message ;

    return getModMsg(context) ;
}

public static TibrvMsg getModMsg(Context context) {
    TibrvMsg current = context.current ;
    int total = current.getNumFields() ;

    for(int idx = 0; idx < total; idx++)
    {
        TibrvMsgField field = current.getFieldByIndex(idx); 
        if (field.type == TibrvMsg.MSG) { 
            context.current = (TibrvMsg)field.data ; 
            getModMsg(context) ;
        } else { 
            field.id = context.sequence++; 
            context.head.updateField(field); 
        }
    } 

    return current ;
}

If you still think you need to avoid recursion you can just use a stack and push the messages that need to be review.

public static TibrvMsg getModMsg(TibrvMsg message) {
    Stack<TibrvMsg> stack = new Stack<TibrvMsg>() ;
    stack.push(message);

    while (!stack.isEmpty()) 
    {
        TibrvMsg current = stack.pop() ;
        int total = current.getNumFields() ;

        for(int idx = 0; idx < total; idx++)
        {
            TibrvMsgField field = current.getFieldByIndex(idx); 
            if (field.type == TibrvMsg.MSG){ 
                stack.push((TibrvMsg)field.data); 
            } else { 
                field.id = id++; 
                message.updateField(field); 
            }
        } 
    }

    return message ;
}

Hope this helps and ,most important, solve your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you .This really solves the problem. –  Chirota Oct 24 '10 at 17:20
    
You might want to consider accepting this answer :). –  XecP277 Oct 24 '10 at 17:24
add comment

Kind of a vague question, but I feel like looking over the Composite design pattern might help you sort out what you need.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.