Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is quicker, for camelCase to underscores; using preg_replace() or using ord() ?

My guess is the method using ord will be quicker, since preg_replace can do much more then needed.

<?php
function __autoload($class_name){
    $name = strtolower(preg_replace('/([a-z])([A-Z])/', '$1_$2', $class_name));
    require_once("some_dir/".$name.".php");
}
?>

OR

<?php
function __autoload($class_name){
// lowercase first letter
$class_name[0] = strtolower($class_name[0]);

$len = strlen($class_name);
for ($i = 0; $i < $len; ++$i) {
    // see if we have an uppercase character and replace
    if (ord($class_name[$i]) > ord('A') && ord($class_name[$i]) < ord('Z')) {
        $class_name[$i] = '_' . strtolower($class_name[$i]);
        // increase length of class and position
        ++$len;
        ++$i;
    }
}

return $class_name;
}
?>

disclaimer -- code examples taken from StackOverflowQuestion 1589468.

edit, after jensgram's array-suggestion and finding array_splice i have come up with the following :

<?php
function __autoload ($string)// actually, function camel2underscore
{
$string  =  str_split($string);
$pos     =  count( $string );
while ( --$pos > 0 )
{
    $lower  =  strtolower( $string[ $pos ] );
    if ( $string[ $pos ] === $lower )
    {
        // assuming most letters will be underscore this should be improvement
        continue;
    }
    unset( $string[ $pos ] );
    array_splice( $string , $pos , 0 , array( '_' , $lower ) );
}
$string  =  implode( '' , $string );
return $string;
}
// $pos could be avoided by using the array key, something i might look into later on.
?>

When i will be testing these methods i will add this one but feel free to tell me your results at anytime ;p

share|improve this question
    
The best way to tell what is quicker is to try it. Have you? –  Tomalak Oct 22 '10 at 9:09
1  
Grab your favorite profiler and benchmark –  Gordon Oct 22 '10 at 9:09
    
maybe interesting for the people reading the following: paulferrett.com/2009/php-camel-case-functions webdevblog.info/php/… –  immeëmosol Oct 22 '10 at 9:10
    
bwah, i'll put that on my todo list, this is just a question that could be answered by someone who has already done this and/or is good in the know of profiling/benchmarking. –  immeëmosol Oct 22 '10 at 9:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

i think (and i'm pretty much sure) that the preg_replace method will be faster - but if you want to know, why dont you do a little benchmark calling both functions 100000 times and measure the time?

share|improve this answer
    
you are absolutely right! –  etbal Oct 22 '10 at 9:13

(Not an answer but too long to be a comment - will CW)

If you're going to compare, you should at least optimize a little on the ord() version.

$len = strlen($class_name);
$ordCurr = null;
$ordA = ord('A');
$ordZ = ord('Z');
for ($i = 0; $i < $len; ++$i) {
    $ordCurr = ord($class_name[$i]);
    // see if we have an uppercase character and replace
    if ($ordCurr >= $ordA && $ordCurr <= $ordZ) {
        $class_name[$i] = '_' . strtolower($class_name[$i]);
        // increase length of class and position
        ++$len;
        ++$i;
    }
}

Also, pushing the name onto a stack (an array) and joining at the end might prove more efficient than string concatenation.

BUT Is this worth the optimization / profiling in the first place?

share|improve this answer
    
more useful as well, $class_name[$i] = '_' . strtolower($class_name[$i]); does not work as expected... –  immeëmosol Oct 22 '10 at 9:35
    
@immeëmosol No, at least you should maintain a new string for the result. I didn't really dig into the code - just wanted to illustrate some simple techniques :) –  jensgram Oct 22 '10 at 10:13
    
your array idea got me working on a different implementation. at a certain point i will be testing them for speed( by the way, i don't like comments without linebreaks :s ). i'll put the code in a comment because of that. –  immeëmosol Oct 22 '10 at 10:53

My usecase was slightly different than the OP's, but I think it's still illustrative of the difference between preg_replace and manual string manipulation.

$a = "16 East, 95 Street";

echo "preg: ".test_preg_replace($a)."\n";
echo "ord:  ".test_ord($a)."\n";

$t = microtime(true);
for ($i = 0; $i &lt 100000; $i++) test_preg_replace($a);
echo (microtime(true) - $t)."\n";
$t = microtime(true);
for ($i = 0; $i &lt 100000; $i++) test_ord($a);
echo (microtime(true) - $t)."\n";

function test_preg_replace($s) {
    return preg_replace('/[^a-z0-9_-]/', '-', strtolower($s));
}
function test_ord($s) {
    $a = ord('a');
    $z = ord('z');
    $aa = ord('A');
    $zz = ord('Z');
    $zero = ord('0');
    $nine = ord('9');
    $us = ord('_');
    $ds = ord('-');
    $toret = ''; 
    for ($i = 0, $len = strlen($s); $i < $len; $i++) {
        $c = ord($s[$i]);
        if (($c >= $a && $c &lt;= $z) 
            || ($c >= $zero && $c &lt;= $nine)
            || $c == $us 
            || $c == $ds)
        {   
            $toret .= $s[$i];
        }   
        elseif ($c >= $aa && $c &lt;= $zz)
        {   
            $toret .= chr($c + $a - $aa); // strtolower
        }   
        else
        {   
            $toret .= '-';
        }   
    }   
    return $toret;
}

The results are

0.42064881324768
2.4904868602753

so the preg_replace method is vastly superior. Also, string concatenation is slightly faster than inserting into an array and imploding it.

share|improve this answer

If all you want to do is convert camel case to underscores, you can probably write a more efficient function to do so than either ord or preg_replace in less time than it takes to profile them.

share|improve this answer
    
i hopefully did with the last added method, still will profile them on some terribly dreadful sunny day though. –  immeëmosol Oct 22 '10 at 11:07

I've written a benchmark using the following four functions and I figured out that the one implemented in Magento is the fastest one (it's Test4):

Test1:

/**
 * @see: http://www.paulferrett.com/2009/php-camel-case-functions/
 */
function fromCamelCase_1($str)
{
    $str[0] = strtolower($str[0]);
    return preg_replace('/([A-Z])/e', "'_' . strtolower('\\1')", $str);
}

Test2:

/**
 * @see: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3995338/phps-preg-replace-versusvs-ord#answer-3995435
 */
function fromCamelCase_2($str)
{
    // lowercase first letter
    $str[0] = strtolower($str[0]);

    $newFieldName = '';
    $len = strlen($str);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $len; ++$i) {
        $ord = ord($str[$i]);
        // see if we have an uppercase character and replace
        if ($ord > 64 && $ord < 91) {
            $newFieldName .= '_';
        }
        $newFieldName .= strtolower($str[$i]);
    }
    return $newFieldName;
}

Test3:

/**
 * @see: http://www.paulferrett.com/2009/php-camel-case-functions/#div-comment-133
 */
function fromCamelCase_3($str) {
    $str[0] = strtolower($str[0]);
    $func = create_function('$c', 'return "_" . strtolower($c[1]);');
    return preg_replace_callback('/([A-Z])/', $func, $str);
}

Test4:

/**
 * @see: http://svn.magentocommerce.com/source/branches/1.6-trunk/lib/Varien/Object.php :: function _underscore($name)
 */
function fromCamelCase_4($name) {
    return strtolower(preg_replace('/(.)([A-Z])/', "$1_$2", $name));
}

Result using the string "getExternalPrefix" 1000 times:

fromCamelCase_1: 0.48158717155457
fromCamelCase_2: 2.3211658000946
fromCamelCase_3: 0.63665509223938
fromCamelCase_4: 0.18188905715942

Result using random strings like "WAytGLPqZltMfHBQXClrjpTYWaEEkyyu" 1000 times:

fromCamelCase_1: 2.3300149440765
fromCamelCase_2: 4.0111720561981
fromCamelCase_3: 2.2800230979919
fromCamelCase_4: 0.18472790718079

Using the test-strings I got a different output - but this should not appear in your system:

original:
MmrcgUmNfCCTOMwwgaPuGegEGHPzvUim

last test:
mmrcg_um_nf_cc_to_mwwga_pu_geg_eg_hpzv_uim

other tests:
mmrcg_um_nf_c_c_t_o_mwwga_pu_geg_e_g_h_pzv_uim

As you can see at the timestamps - the last test has the same time in both tests :)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.