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I have two identical (but differently named) C structures:

typedef struct {
      double x;
      double y;
      double z;
} CMAcceleration;


typedef struct {
    double x;
    double y;
    double z;   
} Vector3d;

Now I want to assign a CMAcceleration variable to a Vector3d variable (copying the whole struct). How can I do this?

I tried the following but get these compiler errors:

vector = acceleration;           // "incompatible type"
vector = (Vector3d)acceleration; // "conversion to non-scalar type requested"

Of course I can resort to set all members individually:

vector.x = acceleration.x;
vector.y = acceleration.y;
vector.z = acceleration.z;

but that seems rather inconvenient.

What's the best solution?

share|improve this question
1  
Can't you just typedef (say typedef struct CMAcceleration Vector3d) ? Ooops, someone had already pointed out... – Nyan Oct 22 '10 at 11:37
up vote 28 down vote accepted

That's your only solution (apart from wrapping it into a function):

vector.x = acceleration.x;
vector.y = acceleration.y;
vector.z = acceleration.z;

You could actually cast it, like this (using pointers)

Vector3d *vector = (Vector3d*) &acceleration;

but this is not in the specs and therefore the behaviour depends on the compiler, runtime and the big green space monster.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: Good answer. Describes both the only method that's guaranteed to work, and the method that will usually work in practice, and the reason why this method is technically undefined. – Oliver Charlesworth Oct 22 '10 at 11:18
    
+1 I would only add that the casting technique is pretty common - it is not like its truly evil. – Prof. Falken Oct 22 '10 at 11:41
1  
+1 for wrapping it in a function. Even something as trivial as this is well worth making a subroutine for. – alesplin Oct 22 '10 at 15:43
    
What happens if we declare CMAcceleration as struct { Vector3d vec; };? Then CMAcceleration instances will have Vector3d in first sizeof(Vector3d) bytes. Would that eliminate strict aliasing when performing pointer casting? – holgac Apr 11 '15 at 9:03
    
Then we wouldn't need to cast pointers anymore. We could just straightfowardly assign vector = acc.vec;. – Hermann Döppes Jan 9 at 10:40

You could use a pointer to do the typecast;

vector = *((Vector3d *) &acceleration);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 This is the obvious solution :) – Venemo Oct 22 '10 at 10:52
2  
It should be pointed out that the compiler is not obliged to ensure that both structs are packed and aligned in the same way. – Oliver Charlesworth Oct 22 '10 at 11:10
2  
This is undefined behaviour because of strict aliasing. cellperformance.beyond3d.com/articles/2006/06/… – Secure Oct 22 '10 at 11:12
    
@Secure: good link, thanks! – groovingandi Oct 22 '10 at 11:36
    
@Secure That's a shame because I would like to use this technique to not copy but actually alias (change the type of) a struct. – Michael Oct 22 '14 at 2:40

You use an utility function for that:

void AccelerationToVector( struct CMAcceleration* from, struct Vector3d* to )
{
     to->x = from->x;
     to->y = from ->y;
     to->z = from->z;
}
share|improve this answer

Why dont you use.

typedef CMAcceleration Vector3d;

(instead of creating a whole new structure)

in that case vector = acceleration; compiles just fine.

share|improve this answer
    
I get a warning: 'typedef struct Vector3d Vector3d' does not refer to the unqualified type, so it is not used for linkage. Also in this case, CMAcceleration is in a weakly linked framework, so I refrain from using it in my .h file. – Ortwin Gentz Oct 22 '10 at 11:50
2  
If the CMAcceleration struct is coming from a separate framework, you would be best advised to do the field-by-field copy, instead of the memcpy or type-punning tricks, to make your code robust in the event of any future changes in the other framework. (Even if you know the struct layouts are identical today, maybe they won't remain that way in subsequent releases.) – David Gelhar Oct 22 '10 at 13:03

memcpy(&vector, &acceleration, sizeof(Vector3d));

Please note that this works only, if the physical layout of the structs in memory are identical. However, as @Oli pointed out, the compiler is not obliged to ensure this!

share|improve this answer
1  
It should be pointed out that the compiler is not obliged to ensure that both structs are packed and aligned in the same way. – Oliver Charlesworth Oct 22 '10 at 11:17
    
@Oli Charlesworth: you're right and I updated the answer accordingly – groovingandi Oct 22 '10 at 11:33

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