Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have happened upon the following pattern, and wondered if there is a name for it?

An enum defines the concrete classes:

enum Fruits{ eApple, eBanana };

And a templated struct provides the interface:

template< Fruit T >
struct SomeFruit {
    void eatIt() { // assert failure };
};

We can then implement the concrete classes thus:

template<>
struct SomeFruit< eApple > {
    void eatIt() { // eat an apple };
};

template<>
struct SomeFruit< eBanana > {
    void eatIt() { // eat a banana };
};

And use them thus:

SomeFruit< eApple> apple;
apple.eatIt();
share|improve this question
    
i think this part is useless: "We can then implement the concrete classes thus:". concrete class is implemented using SomeFruit< eApple> apple; –  Andrey Oct 22 '10 at 13:08
    
Why not just make an Apple and Banana class? –  GManNickG Oct 22 '10 at 13:12
    
@Andrey: Notice that without that part calling apple.eatIt() will result in assert failure, and not eat an apple. –  dukedave Oct 22 '10 at 14:26
1  
@Gman: This pattern is interesting to me because we have a strict ordering over the concrete classes which implement SomeFruit, namely the order in which they appear in the enum. Such an ordering is not present between siblings in a vanilla class hierarchy. –  dukedave Oct 22 '10 at 14:30
    
you are right, it is more complicated then i thought –  Andrey Oct 22 '10 at 16:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That's usually used like this (to catch errors at compile-time)

template< Fruit T >
struct SomeFruit;

template<>
struct SomeFruit< eApple > {
    void eatIt() { // eat an apple };
};

template<>
struct SomeFruit< eBanana > {
    void eatIt() { // eat a banana };
};

and often called compile-time polymorphism (as opposed to run-time polymorphism, which in C++ is achieved using virtual functions).

share|improve this answer

I don't know the name, but you are better with not implementing the template - just declaring it will throw a compilation error if someone tries to instantiate :

template< Fruit T >
struct SomeFruit;
share|improve this answer
1  
Yes that is a pleasant side effect of this pattern, such an error would be equivalent to "cannot instantiate abstract class" with vanilla classes. –  dukedave Oct 22 '10 at 14:32
    
@Dave Tapley - yes, it depends what you want. Compile or run-time error. –  BЈовић Oct 22 '10 at 14:39

This is called template specialization. In this case it is explicit (aka full) specialization, which is recognized by template <>, as opposed to partial specialization.

share|improve this answer
    
Correct, however I am interested in the pattern obtained when using an enum for the template parameter, and providing full specialisation for each value of the enum. –  dukedave Oct 22 '10 at 14:28
    
@Dave Tapley: Never have come across a specific name for that, interesting if others have... –  usta Oct 22 '10 at 14:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.