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I have a Rails 2.3.8 app with an action that pulls a large amount of data from a database and renders it with anywhere from 300-600 partials (recursively rendering a tree-type structure). Benchmarking one request gives me response times of about 7 seconds.

I thought that upgrading my Ruby version to 1.9 from 1.8 would give me a performance gain, but as I benchmark the 1.9 version, I'm getting response times of about 9 seconds (2 seconds slower than on 1.8). This was quite surprising to me.

What factors would cause Ruby 1.9 to execute slower than Ruby 1.8?

Below is a portion of the log file.

Ruby 1.8

Rendered family_index/descendants/_fi_hover (0.5ms)
Rendered family_index/descendants/_descendant (4.6ms)
Rendered search/_search_div (0.1ms)
Rendered family_index/descendants/_fi_hover (0.7ms)
Rendered family_index/descendants/_descendant (4.7ms)
Rendered search/_search_div (0.1ms)
Rendered family_index/descendants/_fi_hover (0.5ms)
Rendered family_index/descendants/_descendant (4.5ms)
Rendered family_index/descendants/_fi_hover (0.5ms)
Rendered family_index/descendants/_descendant (37.9ms)
Rendered family_index/surname_groups/_pedigree (3162.9ms)
Rendered shared/_headers (4.6ms)
Rendered shared/_new_messages (0.6ms)
Rendered shared/_home_logo (1.1ms)
Rendered shared/_login_box (4.0ms)
Rendered shared/_navigation (13.6ms)
Rendered shared/_flash_messages (0.8ms)
Rendered shared/_footer (1.0ms)
Rendered shared/_analytics (0.8ms)
Completed in 4552ms (View: 3352, DB: 147) | 200 OK [http://localhost/family_index/surname_groups/31]

Ruby 1.9

Rendered family_index/descendants/_fi_hover (0.3ms)
Rendered family_index/descendants/_descendant (1.9ms)
Rendered search/_search_div (0.1ms)
Rendered family_index/descendants/_fi_hover (0.4ms)
Rendered family_index/descendants/_descendant (2.0ms)
Rendered search/_search_div (0.1ms)
Rendered family_index/descendants/_fi_hover (0.3ms)
Rendered family_index/descendants/_descendant (1.9ms)
Rendered family_index/descendants/_fi_hover (0.3ms)
Rendered family_index/descendants/_descendant (15.1ms)
Rendered family_index/surname_groups/_pedigree (762.8ms)
Rendered shared/_headers (2.6ms)
Rendered shared/_new_messages (0.7ms)
Rendered shared/_home_logo (0.9ms)
Rendered shared/_login_box (3.6ms)
Rendered shared/_navigation (7.3ms)
Rendered shared/_flash_messages (0.7ms)
Rendered shared/_footer (0.8ms)
Rendered shared/_analytics (0.6ms)
Completed in 5736ms (View: 942, DB: 128) | 200 OK [http://localhost/family_index/surname_groups/31]

It appears that Ruby 1.9 is rendering the views and processing the database faster, but is still completing the request slower.

Ruby 1.8:

Completed in 4552ms (View: 3352, DB: 147) | 200 OK [http://localhost/family_index/surname_groups/31]

Ruby 1.9:

Completed in 5736ms (View: 942, DB: 128) | 200 OK [http://localhost/family_index/surname_groups/31]

Update 10-26-2010

I've found the bottleneck in my code. It comes from a line that loads up a ton of ActiveRecord items using the lazy-eager loaded associations. The DB time is small, but I'm guessing that all of the object allocation is taking a toll. Here is my association:

has_many  :deep_branches,
            :class_name => "FamilyIndex::Branch",
            :include => {
              :descendant => [:state, :county, {:wives => {:marriage => [:state,:county,:reference] }}, :reference, {
                :children => [:state, :county, {:wives => {:marriage => [:state,:county,:reference] }}, :reference, {
                  :children => [:state, :county, {:wives => {:marriage => [:state,:county,:reference] }}, :reference, {
                    :children => [:state, :county, {:wives => {:marriage => [:state,:county,:reference] }}, :reference] # add marriages to this data
                  }]
                }]
              }]
            }

Without doing the eager loading, the complete action takes about 40 seconds to complete, so using the :include gives about a 10x performance increase. Still looking for a way to speed this up. Perhaps caching is the only way to go from here.

share|improve this question
    
depend of your code. What is your code and you can say if there are botteneck or not –  shingara Oct 22 '10 at 13:28
    
In general, ruby 1.9 has been improved a lot in terms of performance. I think you will need to show some code. –  elusive Oct 22 '10 at 13:32
    
too much code to post, but I believe sepp2k's response points to a big part of my performance issues. –  Jimmy Z Oct 22 '10 at 13:36
    
300 partials and it is 7 seconds? My pages are like 50 partials and it takes 30 to 40 seconds per page! I don't know whether it is SASS always compiling the .sass files or the JS files being combined into one, or even some sleep statements. But 45 seconds is quite long. –  動靜能量 Oct 27 '10 at 5:42

2 Answers 2

One area where 1.9 can be slower than 1.8 is string handling.

Since 1.9 has proper unicode support indexing or a slicing a unicode-encoded string can take significantly longer than in 1.8 because in 1.8 string[i] will just return the ith byte, while in 1.9 it has to go through the string to find the ith character.

If you do a lot of string handling and do not need proper unicode support, you can just set the encoding to ASCII or possibly binary, which should speed up the string handling considerably.

share|improve this answer
    
I bet this is it. I've got a lot of string splitting operations going on, which certainly would affect performance. I don't need the unicode support, so I'll set the encoding to ASCII and see what happens. –  Jimmy Z Oct 22 '10 at 13:37
2  
@Jimmy, please report back with your findings. –  glenn jackman Oct 22 '10 at 15:09
    
I've checked into the encoding of the app, and the encoding is US-ASCII, so I don't think that it is the encoding problem that I was suspecting before. I added some excerpts from my log files if that helps. –  Jimmy Z Oct 25 '10 at 13:29
    
@JimmyZ: Are you running rails in dev mode? Have you looked at the performance in production mode as well? I imagine rails' auto-reload in dev-mode would be a lot of overhead for 1.9. –  sepp2k Oct 25 '10 at 13:33
    
I am running in dev mode. I've changed a few of the settings to run more like prod mode (like the auto-reload) and it didn't seem to make a difference. Perhaps the verbose logging is adding enough overhead. Let me try running this in production mode. –  Jimmy Z Oct 25 '10 at 13:35
up vote 2 down vote accepted

So the area of my request that was taking the longest time to process was the massive load of data through ActiveRecord's lazy eager loading (see the association listed in the question). I'm not familiar enough with the internals of ActiveRecord 2.3.8, so ultimately I'm unsure of what was causing the "slowness".

I ended up doing my own type of eager loading—fetching all person records in one query, all states in one query, and other associated objects that I needed, putting them in a Hash and then stitching them together into their tree structure.

This has improved performance greatly, bringing the request time down to 1-1.5 seconds. The improvement benefits the app running in both 1.8 and 1.9 and now my app is a little bit faster running in 1.9.

Thanks everyone for your help!

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