Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a stored procedure that has a BEGIN TRANSACTION and COMMIT TRANSACTION statement. Within the transaction is a select query WITH(XLOCK, ROWLOCK).

The transaction can potentially fail due to some calculations that cause an arithmetic overflow error if out of bounds values are supplied. This error would happen before any insert/update statements.

My question is, should I wrap the transaction in a TRY/CATCH and rollback or is this not really required and all locks would be released automatically if the transaction fails? My only concern here is that SQL would not release all locks of the transaction in case the transaction fails.

Thanks,

Tom

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Short answer: Yes.

Whenever I use BEGIN TRANSACTION, I always include use error handling and ROLLBACK. The consequences of hitting an unanticipated (and/or unanticipatable -- you can't know how your code may need to be modified in the future) situation that leaves an open transaction on a Production server are too severe to not do it.

In SQL Server 2000 and earlier, you have to use @@Error logic. In SQL 2005 and up, you get to use the (far superior) TRY...CATCH... syntax.

share|improve this answer

TRY/CATCH isn't required to release locks. However, I think that the following template would be good for most transactions.

BEGIN TRY
    BEGIN TRAN
    ...
    IF (@@error <> 0)
       ROLLBACK TRAN
END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
    ROLLBACK TRAN
END CATCH
--BEGIN FINALLY (doesnt exist, which is why I commented it out)    
    IF (@@trancount > 0)
       COMMIT TRAN
--END FINALLY
share|improve this answer

A much easier way is:

set xact_abort on

This will cause the transaction to be rolled back automatically when an error occurs.

Example code:

set xact_abort on
begin transaction
select 1/0
go
print @@trancount -- Prints 0

set xact_abort off
begin transaction
select 1/0
go
print @@trancount -- Prints 1

If you execute the second segment multiple times, you'll see the transaction count increase to 2,3,4 etc. A single run of the first segment resets all transactions.

share|improve this answer

I like Brad's approach but it needed a little clean up so you can see the error that caused the problem.

begin try
    begin transaction;

    ...

    commit transaction;
end try
begin catch
    declare @ErrorMessage nvarchar(max), @ErrorSeverity int, @ErrorState int;
    select @ErrorMessage = ERROR_MESSAGE() + ' Line ' + cast(ERROR_LINE() as nvarchar(5)), @ErrorSeverity = ERROR_SEVERITY(), @ErrorState = ERROR_STATE();
    rollback transaction;
    raiserror (@ErrorMessage, @ErrorSeverity, @ErrorState);
end catch
share|improve this answer
begin transaction; -- you don't want to hit catch block if begin transaction will fail
begin try

     ... updates/inserts/selects ...

   commit transaction; -- the last statement in try code block is always commit
end try
begin catch
   rollback transaction; -- first step before other error handling code is rollback  transaction
   declare @ErrorMessage nvarchar(max), @ErrorSeverity int, @ErrorState int;
   select @ErrorMessage = ERROR_MESSAGE() + ' Line ' + cast(ERROR_LINE() as nvarchar(5)),  @ErrorSeverity = ERROR_SEVERITY(), @ErrorState = ERROR_STATE();
   raiserror (@ErrorMessage, @ErrorSeverity, @ErrorState);
end catch
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.