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Most command-line programs just operate on one line at a time.

Can I use a common command-line utility (echo, sed, awk, etc) to concatenate every set of two lines, or would I need to write a script/program from scratch to do this?

$ cat myFile
line 1
line 2
line 3
line 4

$ cat myFile | __somecommand__
line 1line 2
line 3line 4
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up vote 10 down vote accepted
sed 'N;s/\n/ /;'

Grab next line, and substitute newline character with space.

seq 1 6 | sed 'N;s/\n/ /;'
1 2
3 4
5 6
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3  
OT, but use seq 1 6 in place of your echo command. – glenn jackman Oct 22 '10 at 17:53
    
@glenn: Thanks. Always something new to learn in UNIX ... – Didier Trosset Oct 23 '10 at 20:34
    
printf "%s\n" {1..6} | sed 'N;s/\n/ /;'. – ghostdog74 Oct 26 '10 at 7:56
$ awk 'ORS=(NR%2)?" ":"\n"' file
line 1 line 2
line 3 line 4

$ paste - -  < file
line 1  line 2
line 3  line 4
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3  
+1 for paste. Note, the default delimiter is tab, use -d"" if you truly want your lines smashed together. – glenn jackman Oct 22 '10 at 17:52
    
+1 paste ;) nice one! – itshorty Oct 8 '13 at 11:24

Not a particular command, but this snippet of shell should do the trick:

cat myFile | while read line; do echo -n $line; [ "${i}" ] && echo && i= || i=1 ; done
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1  
UUOC. while read line; do echo -n $line; [ "${i}" ] && echo && i= || i=1 ; done < File – ghostdog74 Oct 22 '10 at 15:34
    
Heh, I wasn't familiar with UUOC until you posted that. For simple cases, I still think cat is clearer even if it's slightly slower and wastes a process. :-) – kanaka Oct 22 '10 at 15:39
1  
clearer? what is not so clear about input redirection? :) – ghostdog74 Oct 22 '10 at 23:04
    
Like to have the subject (input) first English speakers do. – kanaka Oct 23 '10 at 1:00

You can also use Perl as:

$ perl -pe 'chomp;$i++;unless($i%2){$_.="\n"};' < file
line 1line 2
line 3line 4
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Any tips on making this one-liner shorter are welcome :) – codaddict Oct 22 '10 at 17:18
    
perl -ne 'chomp($p=$_); $q=<>; print $p,$q' file – glenn jackman Oct 22 '10 at 17:56
    
@glenn: That is neat. Thanks. – codaddict Oct 22 '10 at 18:00

Here's a shell script version that doesn't need to toggle a flag:

while read line1; do read line2; echo $line1$line2; done < inputfile
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