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How do you get started with MATLAB?

Hints/Links to some must read/watch tutorials/screen-casts would be great!

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closed as not constructive by PearsonArtPhoto, Aziz Shaikh, evilone, finnw, Tom Redfern Nov 19 '12 at 8:48

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possible duplicate of Matlab for Python programmers –  Jonas Oct 22 '10 at 15:44
1  
Have you finished C? –  Thomas Owens Oct 22 '10 at 16:04
    
Yes, updated the question –  Vaibhav Bajpai Oct 22 '10 at 16:11
    
Though the question I linked was by a Python user, the answers there are very applicable to people who know C/C++/Java –  Jonas Oct 22 '10 at 16:40
    
Just search Matlab primer. There should be a lot pages about the Matlab tutorials. –  cloudfarm Jan 8 '12 at 22:49

9 Answers 9

up vote 8 down vote accepted

How about the MATLAB Getting Started Guide?

Mathworks has very thorough documentation, both online and built in. Simply type

help functionName or doc functionName in the command window to pull up the documentation.

MATLAB also has built in tutorials. For example, enter the following into the command line:

playbackdemo('GettingStartedwithMATLAB', 'toolbox/matlab/demos/html')
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I no particular order:

http://blogs.mathworks.com/videos/category/matlab-basics/

These are a bunch of videos I made on the use of MATLAB.

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cool! thanks :) –  Vaibhav Bajpai Oct 22 '10 at 21:36

How about the tutorials that are in the built-in Matlab help?

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I found this website useful.. teaches the real basic for MATLAB.

http://www.youtube.com/user/chiron27yt#p/c/1/-K9GEEfCFBA

Have a look at it..

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MIT hosts Open Course Ware: Introduction to MATLAB

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klik on the help button,, you can find all things you need to know about matlab.. many people become expert in matlab only by read the help facilities..

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Besides official MATLAB channels there is a great blog that is sadly no longer updated: blinkdagger

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Have a look at yagtom: http://code.google.com/p/yagtom/, it is agood concise intro and deals with (IMO) the most important topics. There are also couple free e-books from Mathworks that focus on numerical analysis http://www.mathworks.se/moler/index.html.

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here is working program doing Euler's method (for diff eq's) between (a,b) with a step lengh of h, and starting value y0.

the functions in here are pretty rudimentary and hopefully will give you a starting point!

function yf = euler(a,b,h,y0)

%%  This  Program implements Euler's Method
%   The user must input their function in the form given in the print
%   statement.  
%% Variables:
% a = start point
% b = end point
% h = stepsize
% y0 = initial value of y
%%  Implementation

uf = input('enter your function in terms of t and yt in single quotes:   \n'); 
%Taking in  uf, as string or else INLINE will fail
f = inline(uf); %turn the string UF into a function in variable y,t

% Keep the values for plotting
%% Step 1
% Assign initial values 
N = (b-a)/h;
y = zeros(N,1);
y(1) = y0;
t(1)=a;
%% Step 2
% Step through Euler's Method, reassign values, and plot.

for i = 2: N
 y(i) = y(i-1) + h*f(y(i-1)); %Each approximation
 t(i) = a + i*h;        
 yf = y(i);
end
plot(t,y,'b+');
data = [ t' y]; % Turn Y into a percent, and save as columns to write to Excel
xlswrite('Euler_Data.xls',data,1,'A3');
end
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