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Just curious: Why is the syntax for try catch in C# (Java also?) hard coded for multiple statements? Why doesn't the language allow:

int i;
string s = DateTime.Now.Seconds % 2 == 1 ? "1" : "not 1";
try
   i = int.Parse(s);
catch
   i = 0;

The example is for trivial purposes only. I know there's int.TryParse.

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5  
Eh, because the designers of either language felt like this was unnecessary? –  Etienne de Martel Oct 22 '10 at 17:38
1  
Feature Request connect.microsoft.com –  user295190 Oct 22 '10 at 18:22
8  
It's a conspiracy by the language designers to make you use K&R brace style. –  Zack Oct 22 '10 at 18:23
    
possible duplicate of Why Do try ... catch Blocks Require Braces? –  Jon of All Trades Sep 25 '13 at 14:43

10 Answers 10

up vote 52 down vote accepted

Consider the fact that there are really three (or more) code blocks in play here:

try {}
catch (myexcption)
{}
catch (myotherexception)
{}
finally
{}

Keep in mind that these are in the scope of a larger context and the exceptions not caught are potentually caught further up the stack.

Note that this is basically the same thing as a class construct that also has the {} structure.

Say for instance you might have:

try
try
if (iAmnotsane)
beatMe(please);
catch (Exception myexception)
catch (myotherexception)
logerror("howdy")
finally

NOW does that second catch belong to the first or the second try? What about the finally? SO you see the optional/multiple portions make the requirement.

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6  
+1 For providing unreadable code :) That being said, nested IF-ELSE blocks have the same issue. –  Brian Oct 22 '10 at 18:12
14  
IF-ELSE is different, since there is at most one ELSE in the IF-ELSE, while there are 0 or more CATCHes in TRY-CATCH. –  THX-1138 Oct 22 '10 at 18:15
    
Brian's correct. The unreadable code is awesome. if-else do have the same issue if you have if-if-statement-else (without curly braces), then the else is ambiguous which one it belongs to. By convention I think it belongs to second if. –  Shlomo Oct 22 '10 at 18:19
1  
@user93422: I disagree. If one did not require braces, the parsing would probably be designed such that all consecutive catches belong to the same scope. This might force one to use braces when this was not the intention, but the same applies to if (b) if (c) DDD(); else EEE(); if you want EEE to execute when b is false. –  Brian Oct 22 '10 at 18:21
1  
@Shlomo: It is perfectly possible to design a grammar which handles this case unambiguously. –  Brian Oct 25 '10 at 13:16

UPDATE: This question was the subject of my blog on December 4th, 2012. There are a number of insightful comments on the blog that you might also be interested in. Thanks for the great question!


As others have noted, the proposed feature introduces ambiguities that are confusing. I was interested to see if there were any other justifications for the decision to not support the feature, so I checked the language design notes archive.

I see nothing in the language design notes archive that justifies this decision. As far as I know, C# does it that way because that's how other languages with similar syntax do it, and they do it that way because of the ambiguity problem.

I did learn something interesting though. In the initial design of C# there was no try-catch-finally! If you wanted a try with a catch and a finally then you had to write:

try
{
  try
  {
      XYZ();
  }
  catch(whatever)
  {
     DEF();
  }
}
finally
{
  ABC();
}

which, not surprisingly, is exactly how the compiler analyzes try-catch-finally; it just breaks it up into try-catch inside try-finally upon initial analysis and pretends that's what you said in the first place.

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4  
Thanks Eric. And thanks for the insight... –  Shlomo Oct 22 '10 at 18:29
18  
"so I checked the language design notes archive" ... why do I picture you going into the Batcave? Only on S.O. would you get an answer like this. You rock, Eric. –  Dan Esparza Oct 22 '10 at 23:14
    
Delphi (yes, it still exists) has exactly this problem: you have to do try{try/catch}finally rather than just try/catch/finally. –  Polynomial Oct 9 '12 at 8:45
    
@leppie: This page is germane to your recent question posted on twitter. I'll post an extended version of this answer on my blog in January. –  Eric Lippert Nov 20 '12 at 17:19
    
Just wondering: Since catch and finally serve very different purposes, how often do you see them combined in one statement? –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Dec 13 '12 at 14:13

More or less, this is a play on the dangling else problem.

For example,

if( blah )
    if ( more blah )
        // do some blah
else
    // no blah I suppose

Without curly braces, the else is ambiguous because you don't know if it's associated with the first or second if statement. So you have to fallback on a compiler convention (e.g. in Pascal or C, the compiler assumes the dangling else is associated with the closest if statement) to resolve the ambiguity, or fail the compile entirely if you don't want to allow such ambiguity in the first place.

Similarly,

try
    try
        // some code that throws!
catch(some blah)
    // which try block are we catching???
catch(more blah )
    // not so sure...
finally
    // totally unclear what try this is associated with.

You could solve it with a convention, where catch blocks are always associated with the closest try, but I find this solution generally allows programmers to write code that is potentially dangerous. For example, in C, this:

if( blah )
    if( more blah )
        x = blah;
    else
        x = blahblah;

...is how the compiler would interpret this if/if/else block. However, it's also perfectly legitimate to screw up your indenting and write:

if( blah )
    if( more blah )
        x = blah;
else
    x = blahblah;

...which now makes it appear like the else is associated with the outer if statement, when in fact it is associated with the inner if statement due to C conventions. So I think requiring the braces goes a long way towards resolving ambiguity and preventing a rather sneaky bug (these sorts of issues can be trivial to miss, even during code inspection). Languages like python don't have this issue since indentation and whitespace matter.

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+1 for introducing me to the dangling else problem. 4 years of comp sci in C/C++ and I'd never heard of that. I just always use K&R style curlies so I never have to think about it. I even do it on one-liners... if(isTrue) { curlies++; }. –  mattmc3 Oct 23 '10 at 1:50

If you assume that the designers of C# simply choose to use the same syntax as C++ then the question becomes why are braces necessary with single statements try and catch blocks in C++. The simple answer is that Bjarne Stroustrup thought the syntax was easier to explain.

In The Design and Evolution of C++ Stroustrup writes:

"The try keyword is completely redundant and so are the { } braces except where multiple statements are actually used in a try-block or a handler."

He goes on to give an example where the try keyword and { } are not needed. He then writes:

"However, I found this so difficult to explain that the redundancy was introduced to save support staff from confused users."

Reference: Stroustrup, Bjarne (1994). The Design and Evolution of C++. Addison-Wesley.

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The first think I can think of is that the curly braces create a block with its own variable scope.

Look at the following code

try
{
    int foo = 2;
}
catch (Exception)
{
    Console.WriteLine(foo); // The name 'foo' does not exist in the current context
}

foo is not accessible in the catch block due to the variable scoping. I think this makes it easier to reason about whether an variable has been initialized before use or not.

Compare with this code

int foo;
try
{
    foo = 2;
}
catch (Exception)
{
    Console.WriteLine(foo); // Use of unassigned local variable 'foo'
}

here you can not guarantee that foo is initialized.

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I think this is a poor argument. For one: an if statement without curly braces also starts a new (one-line) scope. –  Greg Oct 22 '10 at 17:50
1  
In your second example, using foo after the try/catch block would also result in a compiler error (since you didn't assign foo inside the catch). So if you could do try/catch without curly braces, you would have to follow the same rules as other block statements with respect to declaration statements. –  Michael Petito Oct 22 '10 at 17:54
2  
@Greg : try declaring and initializing a variable in that if statement –  Hans Passant Oct 22 '10 at 17:54
    
I get that it creates its own scope. I don't see why that is necessary, and certainly not why the language designers mandated it to be necessary. –  Shlomo Oct 22 '10 at 17:58
    
@Hans - The result: Embedded statement cannot be a declaration or labeled statement. Which is the same error message you get when declaring a variable after a brace-less using statement. And the using statement certainly creates a new scope. Maybe there is a subtle difference that I'm not aware of? –  Greg Oct 22 '10 at 18:07
try // 1
try // 2
  something();
catch { // A
}
catch { // B
}
catch { // C
}

does B catches try 1 or 2?

I don't think you can resolve this unambiguously, since the snippet might mean:

try // 1
{
    try // 2
        something();
    catch { // A
    }
}
catch { // B
}
catch { // C
}


try // 1
{
    try // 2
        something();
    catch { // A
    }
    catch { // B
    }
}
catch { // C
}
share|improve this answer

Probably to discourage overuse. A try-catch block is big and ugly, and you're going to notice when you're using it. This mirrors the effect that a catch has on your application's performance - catching an exception is extremely slow compared to a simple boolean test.

In general you should avoid errors, not handle them. In the example you give, a much more efficient method would be to use

if(!int.TryParse(s, out i))
 i=0;
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1  
Always avoid errors, yes. But there are errors that can happen no matter how careful you are or how many checks you make (for ex. when writing code that deals with IO devices like the file system or networks). –  Michael Petito Oct 22 '10 at 17:45
5  
I'm willing to bet this syntax wasn't invented because Anders said, "I wonder if we can make this syntax ugly enough to avoid use." –  Kirk Woll Oct 22 '10 at 17:46
    
@Michael-Petito Clearly they're a necessary construct, I just don't think they need to be applied as the general solution. –  Jake Oct 22 '10 at 17:54
    
@Kirk-Woll Ok when you put it that way it does sound a little silly, but I really can't think of a better reason. –  Jake Oct 22 '10 at 17:55
3  
syntactic vinegar? –  Kate Gregory Oct 22 '10 at 18:28

The rational is that it's more maintainable (easier to change, less likely to break, ergo higher quality):

  1. it's clearer, and
  2. it's easier to change because if you need to add a line to your blocks you don't introduce a bug.

As to why exception handling is different than conditional expressions...

  • If/Else is conditional upon an expression to use one of two (or more If/Else if/Else) paths in the code
  • Try/Catch is part of exception handling, it is not a conditional expression. Try/Catch/Finally operates only when an exception has been thrown inside the scope of the Try block.

Exception handling will traverse up the stack/scope until it finds a Catch block that will catch the type of exception that was thrown. Forcing scope identifiers makes this check for blocks simplified. Forcing you to scope when dealing with exceptions seems like a good idea, it also is a good indication that this is part of exception handling rather than normal code. Exceptions are exceptions, not something you really want happening normally but know can happen and want to handle when they do happen.

EDIT: There is one more reason which I can think of, is that CATCH is mandatory after a TRY unlike ELSE. Hence there needs to be definite way to define the TRY block.

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2  
I don't agree with your analogy. lock and using statements do not require the {} block syntax, and they are not "conditional". –  Kirk Woll Oct 22 '10 at 17:44
    
@Kirk - Maybe you are right, but this is just my thought over this question. –  Sachin Shanbhag Oct 22 '10 at 17:48
1  
"... there needs to be a definite way to define the TRY block": yes, but that doesn't mean that way has to be using a curly brace. The following is valid C# code: do i = 1+ 1; while (true);. Where is the end of the do block? –  Michael Petito Oct 22 '10 at 18:13

Another way of looking at this…

Given all the maintenance problem that have been created by “if”, “while”, “for” and “foreach” statements without bases, a lot of companies have coding standards that always require bases on statements that act on a “block”.

So they make you write:

if (itIsSo)
{
ASingleLineOfCode();
}

Rather then:

if (itIsSo)
ASingleLineOfCode();

(Note as indenting is not checked by the compiler, it can't be depended on to be right)

A good case could be made for designing a language that always require the bases, but then too many people would have hated C# due to having to always use the bases. However for try/catch there was not an expectation of being able to get away without using the bases, so it was possible to require them without to many people complaining.


Given a choose I would much rather have if/endIf (and while/endWhile) as the block delimiters but the USA got its way on that one. (C got to define what most languages look like rather than Module2, afterall most of what we do is defined by history not logic)

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The simplest (I think) answer is that each block of code in C/C++/C# requires curly braces.

EDIT #1

In response to negative votes, directly from MSDN:

try-catch (C# Reference)

The try-catch statement consists of a try block followed by one or more catch clauses, which specify handlers for different exceptions.

As per definition says, it is a block, so it requires curly braces. That is why we cannot use it without { }.

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First, there is no such thing as C/C++/C#. And second, the question is "why is this a block"? After a while, if, or for you can have a single statement (no braces), so @Shlomo asks why that's not the case for try in C# and Java. –  Kate Gregory Oct 22 '10 at 18:07
4  
@Kate Gregory: There may be no such thing as C/C++/C#, but there is, C++ and C#. The same as when we say Windows 95/98/NT/XP, etc. There is no such thing either! Besides, we understand that we're speaking about different versions of a Windows family. That is the same I meant here. –  Will Marcouiller Oct 22 '10 at 18:16
    
@Kate Gregory: This is a block because you have multiple instructions within a try block. You may have try...catch, try...finally or try...catch...finally. The try instruction is a block per itself. If you compare with if, while, for, there are no other combination of instructions with these, per opposition to the try block. So, try is definitely a block, and blocks require curly braces. In the end, we sum up with the same conclusion as my answer, only my answer is simpler than this comment. –  Will Marcouiller Oct 22 '10 at 18:26
1  
The problem with this idea is that the chunk following an if statement is often called an if block. It's called a block when you're talking about it simply because that's a good name for it. Nobody calls an if block a single-statement-or-block :) –  Billy ONeal Oct 22 '10 at 19:48
1  
if (condition) statement; A statement is either a single command, or it is a compound command, wrapped in {}. This is fairly standard across the C-Style languages. So the question is, did they have to do some clever grammar parsing to require a compound command after try-catch-finally? –  Chris Cudmore Oct 22 '10 at 19:52

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