Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can someone explain the potential logic behind a group assignment like this in javascript:

var next, output = null, thisNode;

It appears like it's some type of coalescing like var foo = bar || baz;, but I'm not so familiar with the commas. Thoughts?

share|improve this question
1  
"Obtuse"? It's perfectly clearly laid out in the spec. –  T.J. Crowder Oct 22 '10 at 18:00
    
Yeah, but 3..toString() is clearly laid out in the spec too. –  Alex Mcp Oct 22 '10 at 18:25
    
Not with two dots. And...your point? ;-) –  T.J. Crowder Oct 22 '10 at 21:50
    
No, two dots IS defined behavior. (int)(dot) needs to be followed by a digit, because it expects you're forming a float. This (3.toString()) throws an error. A (three)(dot), however, evaluates to (three)(dot)(zero), a float. THIS accepts a dot as a method-accessing character, which then lets you cast to string. Just saying that "Defined" and "useful/common/understandable" have only a bit of overlap, particularly WRT javascript. –  Alex Mcp Oct 23 '10 at 3:06
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It's just a shorter way of writing:

var next;
var output = null;
var thisNode;
share|improve this answer
    
Just to emphasize for the OP: It's exactly the same as your rewritten version. Exactly, including the order (which can be important). –  T.J. Crowder Oct 22 '10 at 18:00
    
How is it that we have identical answers submitted at the same time, and there is this much difference between ratings? –  Gabriel McAdams Feb 13 '12 at 19:43
add comment

multiple variable declarations.

its the same as this:

var next;
var output = null;
var thisNode;
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.