Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let say I have the following method::

public static int CountNonNullMembers<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
{
    if (enumerable == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("enumerable");
    int count = 0;
    foreach (var x in enumerable)
    {
        if (x != null) count++; 
    }
    return count;
}

And I have these 3 arrays::

var ints = Enumerable.Range(0,10).ToArray();
var nullableInts = Array.ConvertAll(ints,x=>x as int?);
var strings = Array.ConvertAll(ints,x => x.ToString());

I wrote a little func to do a loop and time it for a million iterations. Applying it to ints and strings finishes in about 100 ms on my machine. For nullableInts, it takes 2.5 seconds. As I understand the check for null on int doesn't make sense, so the compiler has a different template for non-nullable struct types, that removes null checks. But Nullable<T> do not have a template that converts the null check to x.HasValue. If I have an unconstrained function how can I do a null check that will perform well? I can't use EqualityComparer<T>, as null might not be a member of T as there is no constraint.

Also it's impossible to have overloads that differ by constrain, so I can't say have one for structs, one for Nullable<T>, and one for classes.

Edit for clarity:

The caller of the method is non-constrained. This is just an example (not the actual method) the method calling is non-constrained. I need to do some work against non-null members, and it's a generic method. I suppose I could write a version that doesn't do the check vs one that does (and consequently has a different signature), but it's seems very ugly and unneeded.

Edit2::

Also, the extension method .Count inexplicably performs horribly for NullableInts and strings, (equally bad) so it really isn't the right approach. This might be the delegate invocation but I doubt it. Using the UnboxT style method of Check<T>.IfNull performs a lot better. Okay really weird switching the body of the count to this performs great::

    public static int CountNonNullMembers<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
    {
        return enumerable.Count(Check<T>.IfNull.Invoke);
    }

why?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

You can constrain generic type parameters to reference types or values types:

public static int CountNonNull<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
    where T : class
{
    return source.Count(x => x != null);
}

public static int CountNonNull<T>(this IEnumerable<Nullable<T>> source)
    where T : struct
{
    return source.Count(x => x.HasValue);
}

You don't need an overload for non-nullable structs, because they can't be null anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work as the call site is non-constrained. This is just an example (not the actual method) the method calling is non-constrained. –  Michael B Oct 22 '10 at 18:30
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using the UnboxT approach works. But I'd also like something that doesn't require creating a static type::

public static class Check<T>
{
            public static readonly Predicate<T> IfNull = CreateIfNullDelegate();
            private static bool AlwaysFalse(T obj)
            {
                return false;
            }

            private static bool ForRefType(T obj)
            {
                return object.ReferenceEquals(obj, null);
            }

            private static bool ForNullable<Tu>(Tu? obj) where Tu:struct
            {
                return !obj.HasValue;
            }
            private static Predicate<T> CreateIfNullDelegate()
            {
                if (!typeof(T).IsValueType)
                    return ForRefType;
                else
                {
                    Type underlying;
                    if ((underlying = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(typeof(T))) != null)
                    {
                        return Delegate.CreateDelegate(
                            typeof(Predicate<T>),
                            typeof(Check<T>)
                                .GetMethod("ForNullable",BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Static)
                                    .MakeGenericMethod(underlying)
                        ) as Predicate<T>;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        return AlwaysFalse;
                    }
                }
            }
        }

Using this approach everything performs about the same. Strings performs worse, but not so much worse than everything else.

share|improve this answer

While not necessarily better than your method, it doesn't require a whole class:

static Dictionary<Type, object> NullChecks = new Dictionary<Type, object>();
public static Func<T, bool> MakeNullCheck<T>()
{
    object obj;
    Func<T, bool> func;
    if (NullChecks.TryGetValue(typeof(T), out obj))
        return (Func<T, bool>)obj;
    if (typeof(T).IsClass)
        func = x => x != null;
    else if (Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(typeof(T)) != null)
    {
        var param = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T));
        func = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(
            Expression.Property(param, typeof(T).GetProperty("HasValue")), param).Compile();
    }
    else
        func = x => false;
    NullChecks[typeof(T)] = func;
    return func;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The point was to do this in a way that performs. OfType<T> requires casting and doing an if check its really quite bad. –  Michael B Oct 22 '10 at 19:17
    
How badly does OfType perform? –  Gabe Oct 22 '10 at 19:41
    
Michael: I see your problem now. It's not that the null check is slow, it's that the int? values keep getting boxed. –  Gabe Oct 23 '10 at 1:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.