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Interesting problem I ran across which makes total sense. I have a generic method like so:

public TResult Run<TResult>(Func<SqlDataReader, TResult> resultDelegate)
{
   TResult result;

   using (SqlDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader()) // command is SqlCommand with attached SqlConnection
   {
      result = resultsDelegate(reader);
   }

   // Some other unrelated code (but that's why result has a variable)

   return result;
}

In one case, the resultDelegate's return type (TResult) is IEnumerable<object>. The problem is that the Run function returns immediately due to deferred execution, disposing the SqlDataReader. Later in the code when I try to read through the results (which the delegate does reader.Read(), I get an InvalidOperationException: Invalid attempt to call Read when reader is closed.

I'm having a hard time figuring out the best way around this. I know I can return a concrete list, but I would like to avoid that if possible. I can also move the using statement inside the delegate, but once again, if I can avoid doing that for every delegate it would be nice. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Perhaps:

public TResult Run<TResult>(Func<SqlDataReader, TResult> resultDelegate)
{
   TResult result;

   using (SqlDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader()) // command is SqlCommand with attached SqlConnection
   {
      result = resultsDelegate(reader);
      if (typeof(TResult) == typeof(IEnumerable<object>)) 
      {
         var enumerable = result as IEnumerable<object>;
         if (enumerable != null) 
         {
            result = enumerable.ToList();  
         }
      }
   }

   // Some other unrelated code (but that's why result has a variable)

   return result;

}
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting idea--you're forcing it to be a concrete list, but outside the scope of the delegate. I think in this case it has hidden and unintended consequences (list has to be allocated in memory). If I had to go this route I would probably throw an exception instead if the delegate returns IEnumerable; that way it's obvious what is really occurring. – Nelson Rothermel Oct 22 '10 at 19:37
    
kudos JeffN825 for a very creative answer. – pstrjds Oct 22 '10 at 19:47
    
If you don't keep your reader open, there's no way of using deferred execution at all. You MUST allocate and enumerate the results in the scope of the reader. – Jeff Oct 22 '10 at 21:31
    
Right, I understand it must be allocated. What I meant is I would rather do the allocating somewhere else in the code where it's more explicit and obvious. This can easily hide the fact that it has been allocated. – Nelson Rothermel Oct 25 '10 at 22:13

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