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Here is how I would write a function to make an acronym in Java style:

    string makeAcronym(string str)
    {
        string result = "";
        for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++)
        {
            if (i == 0 && str[i].ToString() != " ")
            {
                result += str[i];
                continue;
            }

            if (str[i - 1].ToString() == " " && str[i].ToString() != " ")
            {
                result += str[i];
            }
        }

        return result;
    }

Is there a more elegant way I can do it with LINQ, or using some built in C# function?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Here are a couple of options

A .NET 4 only option using string.Join:

 string acronym = string.Join(string.Empty,
      input.Split(new[] {' '}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries).Select(s => s[0])
      );

In .NET 3.5 (or 4.0), you can do:

 string acronym = new string(input.Split(new[] {' '}, 
      stringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries).Select(s => s[0]).ToArray());

Another option (my personal choice), based on your original logic:

 string acronym = new string(
      input.Where( (c,i) => c != ' ' && (i == 0 || input[i-1] == ' ') )
      .ToArray()
    );
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you'll need .ToArray() in there after your Select. (Unless .net4 no longer requires this conversion... I don't know) –  spender Oct 22 '10 at 19:41
    
@spender: Not in .NET 4 (they finally added a join on IEnumerable) - only in 3.5... msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd783876.aspx –  Reed Copsey Oct 22 '10 at 19:42
    
looks like a stray comma in example 1, which still won't compile for me. –  Steve Townsend Oct 22 '10 at 19:45
    
@Steve: Corrected now. –  Reed Copsey Oct 22 '10 at 19:53
    
np, you got the +1 anyhow :-) –  Steve Townsend Oct 22 '10 at 19:56

Here's a technique I haven't seen so far. It depends on the assumption that all the letters that should be in the acronym (and only those letters) are in upper-case in the string.

string MakeAcronym(string input)
{
    var chars = input.Where(Char.IsUpper).ToArray();
    return new String(chars);
}

// MakeAcronym("Transmission Control Protocol") == "TCP"
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You can do this quite nicely using a Regex/Linq combo:

String
    .Join("",
        Regex
            .Matches("this is a test",@"(?<=^| )\w")
            .Cast<Match>()
            .Select(m=>m.Value)
            .ToArray()
    )
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1  
do you really need regex? What about Char.IsWhitespace? –  Nick Heiner Oct 22 '10 at 19:44
    
No, you probably don't need Regex, but it does give you better control over what represents whitespace between words. If the list grew to include punctuation (for instance), Regex would probably be the tersest means of solving this. Might be useful. –  spender Oct 22 '10 at 20:07

You can use the LINQ Aggregate method to do this in a fairly elegant way.

Something like this:

private static string MakeAcronym2(string str)
{
    return str.Split(' ').Aggregate("", (x, y) => x += y[0]);
}
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This fails if any of the substrings is empty. And aggregation using a StringBuilder would be faster. –  CodesInChaos Oct 22 '10 at 20:11
1  
I challenge the notion that StringBuilder would be perceptibly faster in practice. –  mtreit Oct 22 '10 at 23:40
    
@CodeInChaos: Also, can you give an example of input that will cause this to fail? I'm not quite sure I agree with your empty substring statement. Thanks! –  mtreit Oct 22 '10 at 23:50
    
I think any string containing consecutive spaces and the empty string should fail because y[0] doesn't work if the string is empty. –  CodesInChaos Oct 23 '10 at 0:34
    
@CodeInChaos: I think you're mistaken. Try it out and see. –  mtreit Oct 23 '10 at 3:21

LINQ can work for this but generally I find it's better to build up string values using StringBuilder instance. This allows you to avoid unnecessary string allocations.

string makeAcronym(string str) { 
  var builder = new StringBuilder();
  for ( var i = 0; i < str.Length; i++ ) { 
    var c = str[i];
    if ( c == ' ' ) {
      continue;
    }
    if ( i == 0 || str[i-1] == ' ' ) {
      builder.Append(c);
    }
  }
  return builder.ToString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Reed, not necessarily. I even considered making the inner part of the loop a LINQ query to return the char to put into the builder (i just got lazy and did it the for route). The only performance aspect about this I meant to assert is that it doesn't allocate any intermediate strings. –  JaredPar Oct 22 '10 at 19:57
    
I realized that after I reread your comment, which was why I deleted my comment ;) I agree, though, that eliminating the intermediate strings is very important here. –  Reed Copsey Oct 22 '10 at 20:01
string makeAcronym(string str)
{
    return new string(str.Split(new [] {' '}, 
        StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries).Select(s => s[0]).ToArray());
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Reed fixed. Damn limits –  Yuriy Faktorovich Oct 22 '10 at 19:40

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