Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for a best way to implement common Windows keyboard shortcuts (for example Ctrl+F, Ctrl+N) in my Windows Forms application in C#.

The application has a main form which hosts many child forms (one at a time). When a user hits Ctrl+F, I'd like to show a custom search form. The search form would depend on the current open child form in the application.

I was thinking of using something like this in the *ChildForm_KeyDown* event:

   if (e.KeyCode == Keys.F && Control.ModifierKeys == Keys.Control)
        // Show search form

But this doesn't work. The event doesn't even fire when you press a key. What is the solution?

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 227 down vote accepted

You probably forgot to set the form's KeyPreview property to True. Overriding the ProcessCmdKey() method is the generic solution:

protected override bool ProcessCmdKey(ref Message msg, Keys keyData) {
  if (keyData == (Keys.Control | Keys.F)) {
    MessageBox.Show("What the Ctrl+F?");
    return true;
  }
  return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref msg, keyData);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This seems to be pretty much what I needed. Tnx –  Mr. Brownstone Dec 30 '08 at 21:04
5  
some hint needed.... for its use... where should we use that code... –  KoolKabin Jul 17 '11 at 8:22
3  
This helped me today. Thank you. –  J M Mar 15 '12 at 8:37
    
This works well, but only detects it for me if the form is the active window. Anyone know how to bind it so in any window view it is possible? –  Gaʀʀʏ Jul 18 '12 at 3:41
    
+1. Nice solution. –  Romesh May 29 at 18:01

On your Main form

  1. Set KeyPreview to True
  2. Add KeyDown event handler with the following code

    private void MainForm_KeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.Control && e.KeyCode == Keys.N)
        {
            SearchForm searchForm = new SearchForm();
            searchForm.Show();
        }
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
+ for , Set KeyPreview to True .. was missing that –  Usman Y Oct 30 '13 at 12:01

The best way is to use menu mnemonics, i.e. to have menu entries in your main form that get assigned the keyboard shortcut you want. Then everything else is handled internally and all you have to do is to implement the appropriate action that gets executed in the Click event handler of that menu entry.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that main form doesn't use common windows menus. It uses custom navigation panel that is used to show child forms. The search forms are invoked by click on the ToolStripButton on the child form. –  Mr. Brownstone Dec 30 '08 at 12:16

You can even try this example:

    public class MDIParent : System.Windows.Forms.Form
    {
        public bool NextTab()
        {
             // some code
        }

        public bool PreviousTab()
        {
             // some code
        }

        protected override bool ProcessCmdKey(ref Message message, Keys keys)
        {
            switch (keys)
            {
                case Keys.Control | Keys.Tab:
                  {
                    NextTab();
                    return true;
                  }
                case Keys.Control | Keys.Shift | Keys.Tab:
                  {
                    PreviousTab();
                    return true;
                  }
            }
            return base.ProcessCmdKey(ref message, keys);
        }
    }

    public class mySecondForm : System.Windows.Forms.Form
    {
        // some code...
    }
share|improve this answer

If you have a menu then changing ShortcutKeys property of the ToolStripMenuItem should do the trick.

If not, you could create one and set its visible property to false.

share|improve this answer
    
No I do't have a menu. ToolStripButton for search is actually located on the BindingNavigator control, so adding a menu is probably not an option. –  Mr. Brownstone Dec 30 '08 at 16:06

Hans's answer could be made a little easier for someone new to this, so here is my version.

You do not need to fool with KeyPreview, leave it set to false. To use the code below, just paste it below your form1_load and run with F5 to see it work:

protected override void OnKeyPress(KeyPressEventArgs ex)
{
    string xo = ex.KeyChar.ToString();

    if (xo == "q") //You pressed "q" key on the keyboard
    {
        Form2 f2 = new Form2();
        f2.Show();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
First, overriding ProcessCmdKey is the recommended way of handling a keystroke intended to do some command-like operation, which is what the OP was asking about. Second, you've misunderstood Hans' comment about setting KeyPreview to true; he was just telling the OP why his technique wasn't working. Setting KeyPreview to true is not needed for using ProcessCmdKey. –  RenniePet Jul 12 at 5:58

Okay, so we have a number of methods that can work this out. I have implemented this in a background application. Can anyone please tell me which one would turn out to be more efficient and faster without consuming a lot of memory? I am asking this because the application requires the response to be swift.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.