Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say I submit a form via Ajax and need a response from the server:

  • Pass/fail indicator
  • On fail, a list of validation errors with associated field ids/names, etc

Is there a standard or best practice for the JSON format for such a structure? If so, I'd like to try to stick to it instead of coming up with my own convention.

share|improve this question
    
I have never heard of a standard format. –  Juan Mendes Oct 22 '10 at 22:12
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
{
    "result": "false", 
    "fields":
        [
             {"id": "element1", "name": "element1"},
             {"id": "element2", "name": "element2"},
             {"id": "element3", "name": "element3"}
        ]
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I recommend a different structure where it's "messages" rather than "fields" and each object within that collection possibly has a field associated with it. Not every message returned from the server (whether error message, success message, or otherwise) will be associated with a "field". –  Fleep Jun 6 '12 at 19:36
add comment

OmniTI has a decent standard that I like and recommend: http://labs.omniti.com/labs/jsend

{
    status : "success",
    data : {
        "posts" : [
            { "id" : 1, "title" : "A blog post", "body" : "Some useful content" },
            { "id" : 2, "title" : "Another blog post", "body" : "More content" },
        ]
     }
}

I usually use a variant:

{
    status : "error",
    messages : {
        "some_field" : "message"
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Peter Bui's got this proposal format: http://paydrotalks.com/posts/45-standard-json-response-for-rails-and-jquery

{
  status: "ok|redirect|error",
  to: "http://www.redirect-url.com",
  html: "<b>Insert html</b>",
  message: "Insert some message here"
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Hmm. I don't know about a standard, but you might want to just do something like

{
    "result": "false",
    "errors":
        [
             {"errorCode": "1234", "errorText": "malformed address"},
             {"errorCode": "5678", "errorText": "no username"}
        ]
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Why not just check errors array if result = false? –  StackOverflowNewbie Oct 22 '10 at 22:25
    
it's something we do at work. I'm not sure of the reasoning myself :P I'm assuming it's for a general validation failure case, to which no specific errors map....but then again, that would seem to merit a catchall error code. I'm not sure why they do it :) –  Gopherkhan Oct 22 '10 at 23:39
    
imho its redundant and not fault-tolerance. checking if the error-array has values before accessing them is imho in such cases necessary. otherwise you have to handle exception in accessing –  Stefan Feb 13 '12 at 10:30
    
Yah. True. I'd added a comment about the redundancy before, but I'll just remove the hasErrors flag. –  Gopherkhan Feb 15 '12 at 17:51
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.