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Every time the input s comes from the form; the list is initialized again. How do I change the code to append each new s to the list?

Thank you.

class Test(webapp.RequestHandler):
    def get(self):

        s = self.request.get('sentence')
        list = []                                   
        list.append(s)                      
        htmlcode1 = HTML.table(list)        
share|improve this question
    
To change the behavior, you must change the order of your statements. Why don't you try a few different orderings of the statements to see how the behavior changes? –  S.Lott Oct 22 '10 at 23:31
7  
Avoid names that shadow built-ins ("list"). –  Roger Pate Oct 22 '10 at 23:52
    
@S.Lott: Guess and check isn't a very effective way to learn about a language. It has it's place, but I respectfully disagree in this circumstance. –  JoshD Oct 23 '10 at 0:17
2  
@JoshD: True. However, the question indicates such a profound lack of language skills. Guess and Check is clearly far, far better than what was presented. –  S.Lott Oct 23 '10 at 3:27
    
@S.Lott: That's a good advise and I've been trying new things with the code but I still could not make it work. If you take a look at the answers; you would see that there is still no answer that appends "s" to "myList". If this is so simple; may I ask your help? Thanks. –  Zeynel Oct 23 '10 at 3:53
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not sure what the context of your code is, but this should work:

class Test(webapp.RequestHandler):
    def get(self):
        s = self.request.get('sentence')
        try:
            self.myList.append(s)
        except NameError:
            self.myList= [s]
        htmlcode1 = HTML.table(self.myList)

This makes list an instance variable so it'll stick around. The problem is that list might not exist the first time we try to use it, so in this case we need to initialize it.

Actually, looking at this post, this might be cleaner code:

class Test(webapp.RequestHandler):
    def get(self):
        s = self.request.get('sentence')
        if not hasattr(self, 'myList'):
            self.myList = []
        self.myList.append(s)
        htmlcode1 = HTML.table(self.myList)

[Edit:] The above isn't working for some reason, so try this:

class Test(webapp.RequestHandler):
    myList = []
    def get(self):
        s = self.request.get('sentence')
        self.myList.append(s)
        htmlcode1 = HTML.table(self.myList)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I tried this codepad.org/bdCaLiUs but it still rewrites the list instead of appending. –  Zeynel Oct 23 '10 at 1:09
    
@Zeynel you're not following instructions –  Tim McNamara Oct 23 '10 at 1:14
    
@Zeynel The code you link to looks nothing like my fix. Try copying and pasting my fix into your code. –  dln385 Oct 23 '10 at 1:28
    
@dln385 thanks for the help. I added the exception because the way it is I get the error "htmlcode1 = HTML.table(mylist) NameError: global name 'mylist' is not defined." (I changed "list" to "mylist" as per another commenter re: not to use variables with confusing names. –  Zeynel Oct 23 '10 at 1:57
    
@Zeynel I'm sorry, that was my fault entirely. The last line should have self.list, not list. I updated my examples accordingly. Also, you should use sth's answer if you can get it to work. His code has self.list three times, so make sure you got all of them when you switched to self.myList. –  dln385 Oct 23 '10 at 2:06
show 9 more comments

You could make the list a member variable of the object and then only update it when get() is called:

class Test(webapp.RequestHandler):
    def __init__(self, *p, **kw): # or whatever parameters this takes
        webapp.RequestHandler.__init__(self, *p, **kw)
        self.list = []

    def get(self):
        s = self.request.get('sentence')
        self.list.append(s)                      
        htmlcode1 = HTML.table(self.list)        
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I think that creating self.list in __init__ makes things more explicit –  Tim McNamara Oct 23 '10 at 1:15
    
+1 This is what I wanted to do, but I gave up when I couldn't find the original __init__() for webapp.RequestHandler. I forgot about the *p, **kw trick. –  dln385 Oct 23 '10 at 1:31
    
Wait, what if __init__ makes a call to get? (Again, I'm not sure what webapp.RequestHandler actually does). I think you should self.list = [] before the call to __init__. –  dln385 Oct 23 '10 at 1:36
    
I tried this as is (except I changed "list" to "mylist") but it still not appending "s" to the list. "mylist" is always the same as "s". Thanks for the help. –  Zeynel Oct 23 '10 at 2:01
    
"but it still not appending "s" to the list"? What? How about this? Add print statements to show what's actually happening. This is the correct approach. –  S.Lott Oct 23 '10 at 14:20
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