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Possible Duplicate:
Python Regular Expression Matching: ## ##

I already asked this question, but let me restate it better... Im searching a file line by line for the occurrence of ##random_string##. It works except for the case of multiple #...

pattern='##(.*?)##'
prog=re.compile(pattern)

string='lala ###hey## there'
result=prog.search(string)

print re.sub(result.group(1), 'FOUND', line)

Desired Output:

"lala #FOUND there"

Instead I get the following because its grabbing the whole ###hey##:

"lala FOUND there"

So how would i ignore any number of # at the beg or end, and only capture "##string##".

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1  
Edit your existing question; don't post a new copy to clarify. possible duplicate of Python Regular Expression Matching: ## ## –  Wooble Oct 23 '10 at 2:24
    
i did, but people stopped responding on that one (figured it was too old) –  nubme Oct 23 '10 at 2:26
1  
Too old? It's less than an hour old... have some patience –  Wolph Oct 23 '10 at 2:29
    
sorry. good point, just eager to figure this out. would delete this point if i could =/ –  nubme Oct 23 '10 at 2:33
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marked as duplicate by Wooble, Wolph, cschol, Ned Batchelder, Graviton Oct 23 '10 at 7:46

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your problem is with your inner match. You use ., which matches any character that isn't a line end, and that means it matches # as well. So when it gets ###hey##, it matches (.*?) to #hey.

The easy solution is to exclude the # character from the matchable set:

prog = re.compile(r'##([^#]*)##')

Protip: Use raw strings (e.g. r'') for regular expressions so you don't have to go crazy with backslash escapes.

Trying to allow # inside the hashes will make things much more complicated.

(EDIT: Earlier version didn't handle leading/trailing ### right.)

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thanks, but it doesnt work for the string ####hey## =( lol –  nubme Oct 23 '10 at 4:15
    
Moved my answer to your original question, look there. –  Mike DeSimone Oct 23 '10 at 12:40
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>>> s='lala ###hey## there'
>>> re.sub("(##[^#]+?)#+","FOUND",s)
'lala #FOUND there'

>>> s='lala ###hey## there blah ###### hey there again ##'
>>> re.sub("(##[^#]+?)#+","FOUND",s)
'lala #FOUND there blah ####FOUND'
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import re

pattern = "(##([^#]*)##)"
prog = re.compile(pattern)

str = "lala ###hey## there"
result = prog.search(string)

line = "lala ###hey## there"

print re.sub(result.group(0), "FOUND", line)

The trick is to say (not #) instead of anything. This also assumes that

line = "lala #### there"

results in:

line = "lala FOUND there"
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You don't need to put parens around the whole pattern; match group 0 is the whole matched input text. –  Mike DeSimone Oct 23 '10 at 2:47
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