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alist = [(1,3),(2,5),(2,4),(7,5)]

I need to get the min max value for each position in tuple.

Fox example: The exepected output of alist is

min_x = 1
max_x = 7

min_y = 3
max_y = 5

Is there any easy way to do?

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How many times do you want to iterate the list? (4 times, 2 times or 1 times). –  KennyTM Oct 23 '10 at 6:25

4 Answers 4

map(max, zip(*alist))

This first unzips your list, then finds the max for each tuple position

>>> alist = [(1,3),(2,5),(2,4),(7,5)]
>>> zip(*alist)
[(1, 2, 2, 7), (3, 5, 4, 5)]
>>> map(max, zip(*alist))
[7, 5]
>>> map(min, zip(*alist))
[1, 3]

This will also work for tuples of any length in a list.

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1  
Nice answer, I am yet to learn to use zip etc so elegantly –  pyfunc Oct 23 '10 at 6:29
    
can you say a bit more about what the * in front of alist does? zip behaves REALLY differently without the * there... –  Andrew Nov 6 '12 at 3:44
5  
@Andrew Sure, the * splice the list into the arguments of the function. The best way to understand this is by example: f(*[1, 2, 3]) is exactly the same as f(1, 2, 3), so zip(*[(1, 3), (2, 5), (2, 4), (7, 5)]) is the same as zip((1, 3), (2, 5), (2, 4), (7, 5)) which returns [(1, 2, 2, 7), (3, 5, 4, 5)]. For complete, gory details see the documentation –  cobbal Nov 6 '12 at 7:03
2  
Speaking of bloody details in the documentation, see sure to see tiwo's answer -- which really should've been posted as a comment here -- about not needing the zip calls and just using map(max, *alist) and map(min, *alist). –  martineau Jul 26 '13 at 2:12
>>> from operator import itemgetter
>>> alist = [(1,3),(2,5),(2,4),(7,5)]
>>> min(alist)[0], max(alist)[0]
(1, 7)
>>> min(alist, key=itemgetter(1))[1], max(alist, key=itemgetter(1))[1]
(3, 5)
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A generalized approach would be something like this:

alist = [(1,6),(2,5),(2,4),(7,5)]

temp = map(sorted, zip(*alist))
min_x, max_x, min_y, max_y = temp[0][0], temp[0][-1], temp[1][0], temp[1][-1]

For Python 3, you'd need change the line that createstempto:

temp = tuple(map(sorted, zip(*alist)))

The idea can be abstracted into a function which works in both Python 2 and 3:

from __future__ import print_function
try:
    from functools import reduce  # moved into functools in release 2.6
except ImportError:
    pass

# readable version
def minmaxes(seq):
    pairs = tuple()
    for s in map(sorted, zip(*seq)):
        pairs += (s[0], s[-1])
    return pairs

# functional version
def minmaxes(seq):
    return reduce(tuple.__add__, ((s[0], s[-1]) for s in map(sorted, zip(*seq))))

alist = [(1,6), (2,5), (2,4), (7,5)]
min_x, max_x, min_y, max_y = minmaxes(alist)
print(' '.join(['{},{}']*2).format(*minmaxes(alist)))  # 1,7 4,6

triplets = [(1,6,6), (2,5,3), (2,4,9), (7,5,6)]
min_x, max_x, min_y, max_y, min_z, max_z = minmaxes(triplets)
print(' '.join(['{},{}']*3).format(*minmaxes(triplets)))  # 1,7 4,6 3,9
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At least with Python 2.7, the "zip" is not necessary, so this simplifies to map(max, *data) (where data is an iterator over tuples or lists of the same length).

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Not sure what you mean, because map(max, *alist) is [7, 6] (as is map(max, *iter(alist))). –  martineau Feb 15 '13 at 3:15
    
@martineau map(max, *alist) returns [7, 5], just like map(max, zip(*alist)) does. –  flornquake Jul 25 '13 at 20:16
    
@flornquake: Actually both of them result in [7, 6] in Python 2.7. My initial comment was because there's nothing in the original question about using zip, so I don't understand the relevance of this "answer". Perhaps it was a comment about @cobbal's answer. It does not apply to mine however which uses map(sorted, zip(*alist)). –  martineau Jul 26 '13 at 1:57

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