Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

One of my former students sent me a message about this interview question he got while applying for a job as a Junior Developer.

There are two candidates running for president in a mock classroom election. Given the two percentages of voters, find out the least amount of possible voters in the classroom.

Examples:

Input: 50.00,50.00
Output: 2

Input: 25.00,75.00
Output: 4

Input: 53.23, 46.77
Output: 124 // The first value, 1138 was wrong. Thanks to Loïc for the correct value

Note: The sum of the input percentages are always 100.00%, two decimal places

The last example got me scratching my head. It was the first time I heard about this problem, and I'm kindof stumped on how to solve this.

EDIT: I called my student about the problem, and told me that he was not sure about the last value. He said, and I quote, "It was an absurdly large number output" :( sorry! I should've researched more before posting it online~ I'm guessing 9,797 is the output on the last example though..

share|improve this question
4  
The third example is incorrect. 0.5323 * 1138 = 605.7574. A fraction of a person would have to vote. 605/1138 = 53.16% whilst 606/1138 = 53.25%. I can't imagine a way to produce the percentage 53.23% from 1138 people. That's the breakthrough here: you can't work out how they produced that answer because it's wrong. –  doppelgreener Oct 23 '10 at 8:30
1  
124 is the correct answer for the last example (see answer below) –  Loïc Février Oct 23 '10 at 8:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can compute these values by using the best rational approximations of the voter percentages. Wikipedia describes how to obtain these values from the continued fraction (which can be computed these using the euclidean algorithm). The desired result is the first approximation which is within 0.005% of the expected value.

Here's an example with 53.23%:

10000 = 1 * 5323 + 4677
5323  = 1 * 4677 + 646
4677  = 7 * 646  + 155
646   = 4 * 155  + 26
155   = 5 * 26   + 25
26    = 1 * 25   + 1
25    = 25* 1    + 0

Approximations:
1:   1 / 1
 -> 1 = 100%
2:   1 / (1 + 1/1) 
 -> 1/2 = 50%
2.5: 1 / (1 + 1 / (1 + 1/6))
 -> 7/1 = 53.75%
3:   1 / (1 + 1 / (1 + 1/7))
 -> 8/15 = 53.33%
3.5: 1 / (1 + 1 / (1 + 1 / (7 + 1/3)))
 -> 25/47 = 53.19%
4:   1 / (1 + 1 / (1 + 1 / (7 + 1/4)))
 -> 33/62 = 53.23%

The reason we have extra values before the 3rd and 4th convergents is that their last terms (7 and 4 respectively) are greater than 1, so we must test the approximation with the last term decremented.

The desired result is the denominator of the first value which rounds to the desired value, which in this vase is 62.

Sample Ruby implementation available here (using the formulae from the Wikipedia page here, so it looks slightly different to the above example).

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry I am not good at math and this is barely a sentence to me :( Could you please explain :)? –  sova Oct 23 '10 at 8:51
    
Holy ____! That is cool! –  sova Oct 23 '10 at 9:01
    
According to Loïc, the answer was 124 –  GaiusSensei Oct 23 '10 at 9:13
    
@GaiusSensei: Note that the ratio 66/124 obtained by Loïc is equal to 33/62. –  Nabb Oct 23 '10 at 9:24
    
Well 66/124 = 33/62, I was starting at 100 minimum in my code, don't know why.. –  Loïc Février Oct 23 '10 at 9:26

First you can notice that a trivial solution is to have 10.000 voters. Now let's try to find something lower than that.

For each value of N starting à 1
  For Each value of i starting à 1
     If i/N = 46.77
       return N

Always choose the minimum of the two percentages to be faster.

Or faster :

For each value of N starting à 1
  i = floor(N*46.77/100)
  For j = i or i+1 
     If round(j/N) = 46.77 and round((N-j)/N) = 53.23
       return N


For the third example :

  • 605/1138 = .5316344464
  • (1138-605)/1138 = .4683655536

but

  • 606/1138 = .5325131810
  • (1138-606)/1138 = .4674868190

It can't be 1138...

But 62 is working :

  • 33/62 = .5322580645
  • (62-33)/62 = .4677419355

Rounded it's giving you the good values.

share|improve this answer
    
brute force approach~ I was thinking of a more.. elegant solution (eg. mathematical approach) But I guess your answer does work :D –  GaiusSensei Oct 23 '10 at 8:27
    
Update with faster approach, in O(N) –  Loïc Février Oct 23 '10 at 8:28

(After some extensive edits:)

If you only have 2 voters, then you can only generate the following percentages for candidates A and B:

0+100, 100+0, or 50+50

If you have 3 voters, then you have

0+100, 100+0, 33.33+66.67, 66.67+33.33 [notice the rounding]

So this is a fun problem about fractions.

If you can make 25% then you have to have at least 4 people (so you can do 1/4, since 1/2 and 1/3 won't cut it). You can do it with more (i.e. 2/8 = 25%) but the problem asks for the least.

However, more interesting fractions require numbers greater than 1 in the numerator:

2/5 = 40%

Since you can't get that with anything but a 2 or more in the numerator (1/x will never cut it).

You can compare at each step and increase either the numerator or denominator, which is much more efficient than iterating over the whole sample space for j and then incrementing i;

i.e. if you have a percentage of 3%, checking solutions all the way up in the fashion of 96/99, 97/99, 98/99 before even getting to x/100 is a waste of time. Instead, you can increment the numerator or denominator based on how well your current guess is doing (greater than or less than) like so

int max = 5000; //we only need to go half-way at most.

public int minVoters (double onePercentage) {

    double checkPercentage = onePercentage;
    if (onePercentage > 50.0)
        checkPercentage = 100-onePercentage; //get the smaller percentage value

    double i=1;
    double j=1; //arguments of Math.round must be double or float
    double temp = 0;

    while (j<max || i<max-1) { //we can go all the way to 4999/5000 for the lesser value

        temp = (i/j)*100;
        temp = Math.round(temp);
        temp = temp/100;

        if (temp == checkPercentage)
            return j;

        else if (temp > checkPercentage) //we passed up our value and need to increase the denominator
            j++;

        else if (temp < checkPercentage) //we are too low and increase the numerator
            i++;
    }

    return 0; //no such solution
}

Step-wise example for finding the denominator that can yield 55%

   55/100 = 11/20 

   100-55 = 45 = 9/20 (checkPercentage will be 45.0)


1/1 100.0%  
1/2 50.00%  
1/3 33.33%  
2/3 66.67%  
2/4 50.00%  
2/5 40.00%  
3/5 60.00%  
3/6 50.00%  
3/7 42.86%  (too low, increase numerator)  
4/7 57.14%  (too high, increase denominator)  
4/8 50.00%  
4/9 44.44%  
5/9 55.56%  
5/10 50.00%  
5/11 45.45%  
6/11 54.54%  
6/12 50.00%  
6/13 46.15%  
6/14 42.86%  
7/14 50.00%  
7/15 46.67%  
7/16 43.75%  
8/16 50.00%  
8/17 47.06%  
8/19 42.11%  
9/19 47.37%  
9/20 45.00% <-bingo

The nice thing about this method is that it will only take (i+j) steps where i is the numerator and j is the denominator.

share|improve this answer
1  
Well you are sure that the solution will be <= 10.000 since for 10.000 there is trivially a solution : 5323 and 4677. –  Loïc Février Oct 23 '10 at 8:47
    
Good point. Edited to reflect that. –  sova Oct 23 '10 at 8:52
    
I think this is a very good solution do to readability and the fact that correctness is evident. –  Ivan Oct 25 '10 at 15:20

I cannot see the relevance of this question to a position as junior developer.

share|improve this answer
4  
I can't see the relevance of this answer to the question asked. –  joschi Oct 23 '10 at 9:01
2  
It's an interview question. I can safely bet a years' salary that the question was not thought up by the actual people actually programming on the actual product line. It was something dreamed up by the manager (or, worse, the HR department) based on some half-remembered conversation they overheard about some fluff piece of yellow press writing telling people how to hire the "right talent". Cargo Cult Hiring in short. –  JUST MY correct OPINION Oct 23 '10 at 10:14
    
The relevance is that it isn't a question about junior programming. It is a question of fact, the nature of which excludes practically all activities that a junior or indeed senior programmer would be expected to engage in. I haven't encountered too many junior programmers who could have answered it and I've been hiring for nearly 30 years. –  EJP Oct 25 '10 at 9:24

Then answer that jumped into my head was more of a brute-force approach. There can be at most 5001 unique answers because there 5001 unique numbers between 00.00 and 50.00 . Consequently, why not create and save a look-up table. Obviously, there won't be 5001 unique answer because some answers will be repeated. The point is, there are only 5001 valid fractions because we are rounding to two digits.

int[] minPossible = new int[5001];
int numSolutionsFound = 0;
N = 2;
while(numSolutionsFound < 5001) {
  for(int i = 0 ; i <= N/2 ; i++) {
    //compute i/N 
    //see if the corresponding table entry is set 
    //if not write N there and increment numSolutionsFound   
  }
  N++;
}

//Save answer here

Now the solution is merely a table look up.

FWIW I realize the euclidean solution is "correct". But I'd NEVER come up with that mid interview. However, I'd know something like that was possible -- but I won't be able to whip it out on the spot.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.