Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to port some parts from ginac (www.ginac.de) to C#. But I encountered this:

class Program {

static void Main(string[] args) {

        symbol s = new symbol();          
        numeric n = new numeric();

        ex e = s + n; // "Operator + doesn't work for symbol, numeric"
    }
}

class ex {
    //this should be already be sufficient:
    public static implicit operator ex(basic b) {
        return new ex();
    }
    //but those doesn't work as well:
    public static implicit operator ex(numeric b) {
        return new ex();
    }
    public static implicit operator ex(symbol b) {
        return new ex();
    }

    public static ex operator +(ex lh, ex rh) {
        return new ex();
    }
}
class basic {      
}
class symbol : basic {
}
class numeric : basic {
}

The correct order should be: implicitly cast symbol->basic->ex, then numeric->basic->ex and then use the ex operator+(ex,ex) function.

In which order is the lookup for implicit casting functions and operator functions done? Is there any way around this?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Cast the first operand to "ex". The first operand of the + operator will not be implicitly cast. You need to use an explicit cast.

The + operator actually determines its type from the first operand, which is symbol in your case. When the first operand is an ex, then the ex+ex will attempt the implicit cast of the second operand.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think there is an asymmetry between first and second param –  CodesInChaos Oct 23 '10 at 12:45
    
not entirely accurate. The + operator (and all binary operators) determines the class for which the operator overload will be taken based on either the left operand or the right operand. But otherwise you are correct -- it will not be taken from the inferred type on the left-hand-side of the assignment. –  Kirk Woll Oct 23 '10 at 13:07

The problem is with the operator + According to MSDN, the compiler throws error if none of the parameter in operator + method is of class type in which the method is written. Link to documentation.

class iii { //this is extracted from the link above.. this is not complete code.
public static int operator +(int aa, int bb) ...  // Error CS0563
// Use the following line instead:
public static int operator +(int aa, iii bb) ...  // Okay.
}

This code will work because you are converting at least one of the parameters to ex type:

class basic { }
class symbol : basic { }
class numeric : basic { }

class ex {
    public static implicit operator ex(basic b) {
        return new ex();
    }

    public static implicit operator basic(ex e) {
        return new basic();
    }

    public static ex operator + (basic lh, ex rh) {
        return new ex();
    }
}

class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        symbol s = new symbol();
        numeric n = new numeric();

        // ex e0 = s + n; //error!
        ex e1 = (ex)s + n; //works
        ex e2 = s + (ex)n; //works
        ex e3 = (ex)s + (ex)n; //works
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.