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I want to interpolate a polynomial with the Lagrange method, but this code doesn't work:

def interpolate(x_values, y_values):
    def _basis(j):
        p = [(x - x_values[m])/(x_values[j] - x_values[m]) for m in xrange(k + 1) if m != j]
        return reduce(operator.mul, p)

    assert len(x_values) != 0 and (len(x_values) == len(y_values)), 'x and y cannot be empty and must have the same length'

    k = len(x_values)
    return sum(_basis(j) for j in xrange(k))

I followed Wikipedia, but when I run it I receive an IndexError at line 3!

Thanks

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1  
I would be grateful if the downvoters would explain the downvote... – rubik May 4 '12 at 16:26
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Check the indices, Wikipedia says "k+1 data points", but you're setting k = len(x_values) where it should be k = len(x_values) - 1 if you followed the formula exactly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Now I check this and I tell you the result. – rubik Oct 23 '10 at 20:15
    
Ok, and why if I do: interpolate([1, 2, 3], [1, 4, 9]) it returns -0.5x^2 + 1.5x ? Take a look at this: i.imgur.com/MkATz.gif – rubik Oct 24 '10 at 8:22
    
@rubik: Sorry, but I can't help you with such a specific problem without knowing the interpolation algorithm (and I won't read up on it). Check your logic again or search for an existing implementation. If you post more code on how you apply the interpolation (e.g. the definition/initial value of x is missing in your question), then somebody might be able to help you further. – AndiDog Oct 24 '10 at 17:46
    
I'm using pypol (pypol.altervista.org) and x is monomial(x=1) (pypol.altervista.org/functions.html#pypol.monomial) – rubik Oct 25 '10 at 15:06

Try

def interpolate(x, x_values, y_values):
    def _basis(j):
        p = [(x - x_values[m])/(x_values[j] - x_values[m]) for m in xrange(k) if m != j]
        return reduce(operator.mul, p)
    assert len(x_values) != 0 and (len(x_values) == len(y_values)), 'x and y cannot be empty and must have the same length'
    k = len(x_values)
    return sum(_basis(j)*y_values[j] for j in xrange(k))

You can confirm it as follows:

>>> interpolate(1,[1,2,4],[1,0,2])
1.0
>>> interpolate(2,[1,2,4],[1,0,2])
0.0
>>> interpolate(4,[1,2,4],[1,0,2])
2.0
>>> interpolate(3,[1,2,4],[1,0,2])
0.33333333333333331

So the result is the interpolated value based on the polynomial that goes through the points given. In this case, the 3 points define a parabola and the first 3 tests show that the stated y_value is returned for the given x_value.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! A bit late but I'll try that! :) – rubik Dec 9 '11 at 11:47

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