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I am working on a uni assignment, which is to be done in C. This is my firs time programming in C, and I am VERY close to having a workable solution, but my code is throwing a Segmentation Fault during runtime and I simply cannot locate the cause.

Here is my code:

#include "./shared.h"
#include "./scheduler.h"

PCB_entry      *ready_q ;
PCB_entry      *ready_q_tail;

/*
 * file name priority.c
 *
 * The functions in this file implement a "priority"
 * scheduling scheme. 
 *
 * Functions provided and brief descriptions:
 *
 * PCB_entry * schedule_next (void) - returns next process for CPU
 * 
 * int insert_new (PCB_entry * proc) - insert new process into queue
 *
 * void list_q (void) - debugging function lists queue contents
 *
 * int re_insert (PCB_entry * proc, int run_time) - put process back
 *                 into correct queue after a run on the CPU 
 *
 * int init_q (void) - initialise queue(s)
 *
 */


double pwr (double x, double y)
{
    double i, p;
    p = 1;
    for (i = 1; i <= y; ++i){
        p = p * x;
    }
    return p;
}


/*
 * Function Schedule_next: priority
 * 
 * Called by the central simulation system Returns a 
 * pointer to the PCB entry for the "process" that 
 * should be put on the CPU next
 * 
 */
PCB_entry *
schedule_next (void)
{
   /* if ready_q is null, there are no processes in the system */
   if (ready_q == NULL)
     {
    return NULL;
     }
   else
     { 
       PCB_entry *next;
       PCB_entry *best_proc;

        next = ready_q;
        best_proc = next;
           while (next != NULL)
             {              /* traverse to the end of the list */

            if (next->current_priority < best_proc->current_priority) {
                best_proc = next;   
            }
            next = next->f_link;
           }
        if (best_proc == NULL) {
            return NULL;
        }

        if (best_proc->b_link != NULL){
            best_proc->b_link->f_link = best_proc->f_link;
            if (best_proc->f_link != NULL) {
                best_proc->f_link->b_link = best_proc->b_link;
            }
        } else {

            ready_q = best_proc->f_link;


            if (ready_q != NULL)    /* don't try to de-reference a NULL
                                     * pointer */
               ready_q->b_link = NULL;  /* first process in the queue
                                         * always has a NULL back
                                         * link */
            best_proc->f_link = NULL;   /* just to be tidy -- set both links
                         * in the PCB */
            /* entry that will be returned to NULL */
            best_proc->b_link = NULL;
        }

        return best_proc;

    }
}

/*
 * Function insert_new: Non-preemptive round-robin
 * 
 * Insert a new "process" into the scheduling queue
 * 
 * Accepts a pointer to a PCB entry that will be inserted
 * into the queue returns either OK or NotOK to indicate 
 * success or failure
 * 
 * Since this is FCFS priority scheduling, the new process is
 * simply slotted in at the end of the queue
 * 
 */
int
insert_new (PCB_entry * proc)
{

   if (ready_q == NULL)
     {              /* no entries in table */
    ready_q = proc;     /* insert at the head of the list */
    proc->b_link = NULL;
    proc->f_link = NULL;
    ready_q_tail = ready_q;
    return OK;
     }
   else
     {

        ready_q_tail->f_link = proc; /* Set tail of list pointer */
        proc->f_link = NULL;         /* New tail of list to NULL */
        proc->b_link = ready_q_tail; /* Set the b_link of the new process to previous last record of the list */
        ready_q_tail = proc;         /* Set the tail reference to the new pointer */
    return OK;
     }
#pragma error_messages (off,E_STATEMENT_NOT_REACHED)
   return NotOK; /* this is not really needed, but is here to be defensive */
#pragma error_messages (on,E_STATEMENT_NOT_REACHED)
}

/*
 * Function list_q
 * 
 * Implementation of this function is optional but highly 
 * recommended
 */

void
list_q (void)
{
   PCB_entry *next;

   next = ready_q;

   fprintf (stderr, "\n current state of the ready queue\n");

   next = ready_q;
   while (next != NULL)
     {              /* traverse to the end of the list */
    fprintf (stderr, "%d\t", next->pid);
    next = next->f_link;
     }
   fprintf (stderr, "\n\n");
}


/*
 * Function re_insert: priority
 * 
 * a function to insert a process back into the queue
 * following a run on the CPU. Depending on the
 * scheduling algorithm chosen this would need to
 * do a lot more. In a priority algorithm with boost
 * and reduction, it would need to look at the
 * percentage of the quantum that the process used
 * and determine if a change to the priority was
 * required. Also, in implementing a mulitlevel
 * priority scheme, a variation of the ready_q
 * pointer would be required. The simplest method
 * would be an array of pointers with one element
 * for each priority level.
 *
 * Not that, in this case it is identical to the
 * insert_new code
 */
int
re_insert (PCB_entry * proc, int run_time)
{
    insert_new(proc);
}


/*
 * Function init_q: FCFS priority
 * 
 * Initialises the ready queue
 * 
 * Written as a function so that, if the ready_q
 * becomes an array of pointers, the initialisation
 * can be changed without re-building the main part
 * of the simulator
 */

int
init_q (void)
{
   ready_q = NULL;
    ready_q_tail = NULL;    
   return OK;
}



/*
 * function end_run () 
 * Insert code to do any end of processing tasks for the
 * functions written by the student
 */
int end_run(void)
{
   fprintf(stderr, "This run had %d concurrent processes\n", Get_num_concurrent());
   return 0;
}

Can anyone please help - I really dont want to fail this assignment (due in less than 24 hours). So far, its not looking good.

UPDATE:

I've gone and added a bucketload of fprintf's all over the place, and after a while I think I have isolated the problem at this line:

if (best_proc->f_link != NULL) {

I dont know how this helps me, but in the vain hope that it helps someone see the problem (because I sure dont), then so much the better.

Also, just to be clear, I dont believe this is a multithreaded application (although I am a complete noob, so who really knows) - and I didn't know I could HAVE a debugger or a stack-trace (working from 1st edition K & R "The C Programming Language") so I dont have those either. (On a side note, does programming in C normally feel like a fat japanese man is punching you in the face?)

share|improve this question
1  
Does your debugger or editor tell you where the segfault is occurring? –  BoltClock Oct 23 '10 at 13:05
1  
Please give us the stack trace –  Woot4Moo Oct 23 '10 at 13:05
    
@Woot4Moo: It's just a lot of comments :P –  BoltClock Oct 23 '10 at 13:05
    
@BoltClock oops. I was like sweet god a first time C homework assignment is 300 lines –  Woot4Moo Oct 23 '10 at 13:07
1  
@Ash: "On a side note, does programming in C normally feel like a fat japanese man is punching you in the face?" Yes. ;) –  David Brown Oct 23 '10 at 14:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It looks alright to me - can't find any errors in the code.

Does it fail immediately, or after having run a little while? Are you sure that the init_q function actually runs before starting to use the queue? Have you tried checking if you're getting NULL as a parameter to new_insert or re_insert functions?

By the way, this program is not running in multi-threaded mode, right? If it does you need to protect your global variables in the critical sections.

EDIT4: NOW I think I got it! ready_q_tail is never set to new value when removing the last task from the queue.

Here's a (hopefully) fixed schedule_next function:

PCB_entry *
schedule_next (void)
{
   /* if ready_q is null, there are no processes in the system */
   if (ready_q == NULL)
     {
    return NULL;
     }
   else
     { 
       PCB_entry *next;
       PCB_entry *best_proc;

        next = ready_q;
        best_proc = next;
           while (next != NULL)
             {              /* traverse to the end of the list */

            if (next->current_priority current_priority) {
                best_proc = next;   
            }
            next = next->f_link;
           }
        if (best_proc == NULL) {
            return NULL;
        }

        // Remove task from queue
        {
            int procHasNext = best_proc->f_link != NULL;
            int procHasPrev = best_proc->b_link != NULL;

            if (!procHasNext && !procHasPrev) {
                // There's only one task in the queue
                ready_q = NULL;
                ready_q_tail = NULL;
            } else {
                if (procHasNext) {
                    if (procHasPrev) {
                        best_proc->b_link->f_link = best_proc->f_link;
                    } else {
                        // Proc to remove is the first in queue
                        ready_q = best_proc->f_link;
                        ready_q->b_link = NULL;
                    }
                }

                if (procHasPrev) {
                    if (procHasNext) {
                        best_proc->f_link->b_link = best_proc->b_link;
                    } else {
                        // Proc to remove is last in queue
                        ready_q_tail = best_proc->b_link;
                        ready_q_tail->f_link = NULL;
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        // Ensure that the links in PCB to remove doesn't cause any problems
        best_proc->f_link = NULL;
        best_proc->b_link = NULL;

        return best_proc;

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, no joy I am afraid. –  Ash Oct 23 '10 at 13:54
    
@Ash: Okay, answer updated again. And if my function doesn't work then I've made a mistake somewhere. But the key is that ready_q_tail was never repointed to new tail when removing the last task in queue. That's most likely the cause of your segmentation fault. –  gablin Oct 23 '10 at 14:35
    
Holy cow, you did it! Thankyou, thankyou, thankyou. Now I just need to diagnose the differences. –  Ash Oct 23 '10 at 14:57

Use valgrind to find memory bugs. Sometimes false handling of memory starts far before you actually get a segfault.

share|improve this answer
    
I clarified the question some. –  Ash Oct 23 '10 at 13:44

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