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I have tables that I've tried setting PK FK relationships on but I want to verify this. How can I show the PK/FK restraints? I saw this manual page, but it does not show examples and my google search was fruitless also. My database is credentialing1 and my constrained tables are practices and cred_insurances.

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5 Answers

up vote 111 down vote accepted

I use

SHOW CREATE TABLE mytable;

This shows you the SQL statement necessary to receate mytable in its current form. You can see all the columns and their types (like DESC) but it also shows you constraint information (and table type, charset, etc.).

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Simply query the INFORMATION_SCHEMA:

use INFORMATION_SCHEMA;
select TABLE_NAME,COLUMN_NAME,CONSTRAINT_NAME,
REFERENCED_TABLE_NAME,REFERENCED_COLUMN_NAME from KEY_COLUMN_USAGE
where TABLE_SCHEMA = "<your_database_name>" and TABLE_NAME = "<your_table_name>" 
and referenced_column_name is not NULL;
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This is the best answer because it gives you the result in a format that you can use programmatically. Of course you will need to add a WHERE clause to narrow down the results –  Naveed Hasan Jan 27 at 10:30
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Try doing:

SHOW TABLE STATUS FROM credentialing1;

The foreign key constraints are listed in the Comment column of the output.

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1  
I see only table comments in the Comment column. It is probably something to do with InnoDB types. –  clockworkgeek Dec 30 '12 at 13:48
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The main problem with the validated answer is you'll have to parse the output to get the informations. Here is a query allowing you to get them in a more usable manner :

use INFORMATION_SCHEMA;
SELECT cols.TABLE_NAME, cols.COLUMN_NAME, cols.ORDINAL_POSITION,
cols.COLUMN_DEFAULT, cols.IS_NULLABLE, cols.DATA_TYPE,
    cols.CHARACTER_MAXIMUM_LENGTH, cols.CHARACTER_OCTET_LENGTH,
    cols.NUMERIC_PRECISION, cols.NUMERIC_SCALE,
    cols.COLUMN_TYPE, cols.COLUMN_KEY, cols.EXTRA,
    cols.COLUMN_COMMENT, refs.REFERENCED_TABLE_NAME,
refs.REFERENCED_COLUMN_NAME,
    cRefs.UPDATE_RULE, cRefs.DELETE_RULE,
    links.TABLE_NAME, links.COLUMN_NAME,
    cLinks.UPDATE_RULE, cLinks.DELETE_RULE
FROM `COLUMNS` as cols
LEFT JOIN `KEY_COLUMN_USAGE` AS refs
ON refs.TABLE_SCHEMA=cols.TABLE_SCHEMA
    AND refs.REFERENCED_TABLE_SCHEMA=cols.TABLE_SCHEMA
    AND refs.TABLE_NAME=cols.TABLE_NAME
    AND refs.COLUMN_NAME=cols.COLUMN_NAME
LEFT JOIN REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS AS cRefs
ON cRefs.CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA=cols.TABLE_SCHEMA
    AND cRefs.CONSTRAINT_NAME=refs.CONSTRAINT_NAME
LEFT JOIN `KEY_COLUMN_USAGE` AS links
ON links.TABLE_SCHEMA=cols.TABLE_SCHEMA
    AND links.REFERENCED_TABLE_SCHEMA=cols.TABLE_SCHEMA
    AND links.REFERENCED_TABLE_NAME=cols.TABLE_NAME
    AND links.REFERENCED_COLUMN_NAME=cols.COLUMN_NAME
LEFT JOIN REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS AS cLinks
ON cLinks.CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA=cols.TABLE_SCHEMA
    AND cLinks.CONSTRAINT_NAME=links.CONSTRAINT_NAME
WHERE cols.TABLE_SCHEMA="database"
AND cols.TABLE_NAME="table"
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You can use this:

select
    table_name,column_name,referenced_table_name,referenced_column_name
from
    information_schema.key_column_usage
where
    referenced_table_name is not null
    and table_schema = 'my_database' 
    and table_name = 'my_table'

Or for better formatted output use this:

select
    concat(table_name, '.', column_name) as 'foreign key',  
    concat(referenced_table_name, '.', referenced_column_name) as 'references'
from
    information_schema.key_column_usage
where
    referenced_table_name is not null
    and table_schema = 'my_database' 
    and table_name = 'my_table'
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ORA-00942: table or view does not exist 00942. 00000 - "table or view does not exist" *Cause: *Action: Error at Line: 29 Column: 5 Line 29 is "information_schema.key_column_usage" –  noboundaries Aug 28 '13 at 10:37
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