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Why is foreach loop a read only? I mean you can fetch the data but can't increase++ or decrease--. Any reason behind it? Yes I am a beginner :)

Exmaple:

int[] myArray={1,2,3};
foreach (int num in myArray)
{
  num+=1;
}
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1  
What do you mean by the while loop being read-only? The while loop is a construct; it is neither read-only nor read-write. Can you perhaps post some code and/or clarify your question, please? Thanks. –  CesarGon Oct 23 '10 at 15:46
1  
I think he's talking about the iteration variable, as in foreach ( Item theItem in theItemList )... theItem cannot be assigned to. –  Bob Kaufman Oct 23 '10 at 15:47
    
He's clarified the question now: he's talking about foreach rather than while. –  CesarGon Oct 23 '10 at 15:48
    
Check out stackoverflow.com/questions/776430/… –  InSane Oct 23 '10 at 15:50
1  
@Zai: well, not true strictly speaking; see my answer below. –  CesarGon Oct 23 '10 at 16:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

That is because foreach is meant to iterate over a container, making sure each item is visited exactly one, without changing the container, to avoid nasty side effects.

See: foreach in MSDN

If you meant why would changes to an element like an integer not affect a container of integers, well this is because the variable of iteration in this case would be a value type and is copied, e.g.:

// Warning: Does not compile
foreach (int i in ints)
{
  ++i; // Would not change the int in ints
}

Even if the variable of iteration was a reference type, whose operations returned a new object, you wouldn't be changing the original collection, you would just be reassigning to this variable most of the time:

// Warning: Does not compile
foreach (MyClass ob in objs)
{
  ob=ob+ob; // Reassigning to local ob, not changing original collection
}

Now something like this could modify the object in the original collection:

// Warning: Does not compile
foreach (MyClass ob in objs)
{
  ob.ChangeMe(); // This could modify the object in the original collection
}

To avoid confusion with regard to value vs reference types and the scenarios mentioned above (along with some reasons related to optimization), MS chose to make the variable of iteration readonly.

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Because the current element is returned by value(i.e. copied). And modifying the copy is useless. If it is a reference type you can modify the content of that object, but can't replace the reference.

Perhaps you should read the documentation of IEnumerable<T> and IEnumerator<T>. That should make it clearer. The most important bit is that IEnumerable<T> has a property Current of type T. And this property has only a getter, but no setter.

But what would happen if it had a setter?

  • It would work well with arrays and Lists
  • It wouldn't work well with complex containers like hashtables, ordered list because the change causes larger changes in the container(for example a reordering), and thus invalidates the iterator. (Most collections invalidate the iterators if they get modified to avoid inconsistent state in the iterators.)
  • In LINQ it does make no sense at all. For example with select(x=>f(x)) the values are results of a function and have no permanent storage associated.
  • With iterators written with the yield return syntax it doesn't make sense either
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"And modifying the copy is useless." What if I want to do something like sum the square of all the numbers in a list? It can be done with the read-only restriction, but it's often useful to modify a copy. –  raylu Nov 26 at 8:51

foreach is designed to visit each item in a collection exactly once, and does not use an explicit "loop index"; if you want more control over the loop and have a loop index, use for.

EDIT: You can change the items in the collection being iterated on inside a foreach loop. For example:

foreach(Chair ch in mychairs)
{
    ch.PaintColour = Colour.Green; //this alters the chair object *in* the collection.
}

You cannot, however, add or remove items to/from the collection.

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Actually, you cannot modify a field/property of the object refered to by the variable of iteration, either. –  Michael Goldshteyn Oct 23 '10 at 16:09
    
@Michael: The code I posted works OK for me. I am using .NET 3.5 and Visual Studio 2008. –  CesarGon Oct 23 '10 at 16:23

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