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Hey guys, I'm new to jQuery/js and having a hard time figuring this out. There are two fields in a form of mine i want to do some calculations with, what i tried is this:

jQuery.fn.calculateit = function(){

    var one = $("#one").val();

    var two = $("#two").val();

    //total
    var total = one + two;
    $("#total").text(total);

};

The values "one" and "two" can change at any time, and every time that happens i want the total to change. So I wrote the method above, but I have no idea how to have it called any time something happens with the two fields.

Any ideas?

Maybe I'm on the wrong track, so any suggestions are welcome!

Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here you go:

$("#one, #two").change(function() {
    calculateit();
});

var calculateit = function() {

    var one = parseInt($("#one").val(), 10);
    var two = parseInt($("#two").val(), 10);

    //total
    var total = one + two;
    $("#total").text(total);

};

Or, if you prefer, you can add calculateit to jQuery.fn and call it with $.calculateit().

Or, more concisely:

$("#one, #two").change(function() {

    var one = parseInt($("#one").val(), 10);
    var two = parseInt($("#two").val(), 10);

    //total
    var total = one + two;
    $("#total").text(total);

});
share|improve this answer
    
Or you could make it a little more concise with: $('#one, #two').change(/*...*/); – David Thomas Oct 23 '10 at 20:22
    
@David: Thanks, I have updated my answer. – Chetan Oct 23 '10 at 20:28
2  
To be safe, I recommend calling parseInt() or parseFloat on the returned values before adding them together. Otherwise, you may be concatenating two strings instead of adding their numeric values. – Blackcoat Oct 23 '10 at 20:44
2  
+1 - but, if you use parseInt, it's very important to include the radix of 10. ==> parseInt($("#one").val(), 10) otherwise numbers that begin with a 0 will be assumed to be octal! – Peter Ajtai Oct 23 '10 at 23:38
1  
@Peter: Updated my answer again. – Chetan Oct 23 '10 at 23:48

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