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The program below prints each character written on standard in, but only after a new-line has been written (at least on my system!).

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws java.io.IOException {
        int c;
        while ((c = System.in.read()) != -1)
            System.out.print((char) c);
    }
}

This prevents people from writing stuff like "Press any key to continue" and forces something like "Press enter to continue."

  • What is the underlying reason for this?
  • Is it a limitation of Java?
  • Is this behavior system-dependent (I'm on Ubuntu)? How does it work on Mac? Windows?
  • Is it dependent on the specific terminal I run the application in? (For me it behaves like this in Eclipse and in gnome-terminal)
  • Is there a workaround?
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see my answer in stackoverflow.com/questions/1864076/… –  nagarajub Apr 12 '12 at 7:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

What is the underlying reason for this?

Most terminals is line buffered by default, Java does not receive input until a newline.

Is it a limitation of Java?

Some ancient terminals might only have line-buffered input; though it should be possible to disable buffering in most modern terminal.

Is this behavior system-dependent (I'm on Ubuntu)? How does it work on Mac? Windows?

Yes.

Is it dependent on the specific terminal I run the application in? (For me it behaves like this in Eclipse and in gnome-terminal)

Yes.

Is there a workaround?

There are platform specific hacks. curse in Linux and Unix-like platforms, and getch() in Windows. I'm not aware of any cross-platform way.

related: Why "Press any key to continue" is bad idea:

alt text

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I'm on Ubuntu

Is there a workaround?

Runtime.getRuntime().exec("stty -icanon min 1").waitFor();

And after that all reads of System.in in the same process will read 1 character not waiting for EOL.

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see my answer in Equivalent function to C's "_getch()" in Java?


public static void getCh() {

final JFrame frame = new JFrame(); synchronized (frame) { frame.setUndecorated(true); frame.getRootPane().setWindowDecorationStyle(JRootPane.FRAME); frame.addKeyListener(new KeyListener() { public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) { synchronized (frame) { frame.setVisible(false); frame.dispose(); frame.notify(); } } public void keyReleased(KeyEvent e) { } public void keyTyped(KeyEvent e) { } }); frame.setVisible(true); try { frame.wait(); } catch (InterruptedException e1) { } }

}

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2  
This doesn't read from System.in at all though. –  aioobe Apr 12 '12 at 8:42

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