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I'm using the following code on Windows Vista Ultimate SP1 to query our active directory server to check the user name and password of a user on a domain.

public Object IsAuthenticated()
{
    String domainAndUsername = strDomain + "\\" + strUser;
    DirectoryEntry entry = new DirectoryEntry(_path, domainAndUsername, strPass);
    SearchResult result;
    try
    {
        //Bind to the native AdsObject to force authentication.         

        DirectorySearcher search = new DirectorySearcher(entry) { Filter = ("(SAMAccountName=" + strUser + ")") };

        search.PropertiesToLoad.Add("givenName"); // First Name                
        search.PropertiesToLoad.Add("sn"); // Last Name
        search.PropertiesToLoad.Add("cn"); // Last Name

        result = search.FindOne();

        if (null == result)
        {
            return null;
        }

        //Update the new path to the user in the directory.
        _path = result.Path;
        _filterAttribute = (String)result.Properties["cn"][0];
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        return new Exception("Error authenticating user. " + ex.Message);
    }
    return user;
}

the target is using .NET 3.5, and compiled with VS 2008 standard

I'm logged in under a domain account that is a domain admin where the application is running.

The code works perfectly on windows XP; but i get the following exception when running it on Vista:

System.DirectoryServices.DirectoryServicesCOMException (0x8007052E): Logon failure: unknown user name or bad password.

   at System.DirectoryServices.DirectoryEntry.Bind(Boolean throwIfFail)
   at System.DirectoryServices.DirectoryEntry.Bind()
   at System.DirectoryServices.DirectoryEntry.get_AdsObject()
   at System.DirectoryServices.DirectorySearcher.FindAll(Boolean findMoreThanOne)
   at System.DirectoryServices.DirectorySearcher.FindOne()
   at Chain_Of_Custody.Classes.Authentication.LdapAuthentication.IsAuthenticated()
   at System.DirectoryServices.DirectoryEntry.Bind(Boolean throwIfFail)
   at System.DirectoryServices.DirectoryEntry.Bind()
   at System.DirectoryServices.DirectoryEntry.get_AdsObject()
   at System.DirectoryServices.DirectorySearcher.FindAll(Boolean findMoreThanOne)
   at System.DirectoryServices.DirectorySearcher.FindOne()
   at Chain_Of_Custody.Classes.Authentication.LdapAuthentication.IsAuthenticated()

I've tried changing the authentication types, I'm not sure what's going on.


See also: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/290548/c-validate-a-username-and-password-against-active-directory

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Is this really an exact duplicate? This person is getting an exception message, not asking how to do it... –  Hugoware Dec 30 '08 at 17:29
    
Since you're using .NET 3.5, you might choose to use System.DirectoryServices.AccountManagement. I'm not using Vista at work, but since this is geared for 3.5, it might be more compatible with Vista... –  Hugoware Dec 30 '08 at 17:33
    
I wouldn't call this a dupe.... –  cgreeno Dec 30 '08 at 18:00
    
I figured it out anyhow If you pass in the domain with the username on vista it does not work like "domain\user" so just passing "user" instead seems to work okay - except you have to be on the same domain –  Michael G Dec 30 '08 at 18:07
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4 Answers

up vote 39 down vote accepted

If you're using .net 3.5 use this code instead.

To authenticate a user:

PrincipalContext adContext = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain);

using (adContext)
{
     return adContext.ValidateCredentials(UserName, Password);
}

If you need to find the user to R/W attributes to the object do this:

PrincipalContext context = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain);
UserPrincipal foundUser = 
    UserPrincipal.FindByIdentity(context, "jdoe");

This is using the System.DirectoryServices.AccountManagement namespace so you'll need to add it to your using statements.

If you need to convert a UserPrincipal object to a DirectoryEntry object to work with legacy code you can do this:

DirectoryEntry userDE = (DirectoryEntry)foundUser.GetUnderlyingObject();
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I found that same code floating around the Internet on multiple websites and it didn't work for me. Steve Evans is probably right that if you're on .NET 3.5, you should not use this code. But if you ARE still on .NET 2.0 you can try this to Authenticate to your AD services:

DirectoryEntry entry = new DirectoryEntry("LDAP://" + domain, 
   userName, password, 
   AuthenticationTypes.Secure | AuthenticationTypes.SecureSocketsLayer);
object nativeObject = entry.NativeObject;

The first line creates a DirectoryEntry object using domain, username, and password. It also sets the AuthenticationTypes. Notice how I'm setting both Secure (Kerberos) Authentication and SSL using the "Logical OR" ( '|' ) operator between the two parameters.

The second line forces the NativeObject of "entry" to Bind to the AD services using the information from the first line.

If an exception is thrown, then the credentials (or settings) were bad. If no exception, you're authenticated. The exception message will usually indicate what went wrong.

This code is pretty similar to what you already have, but the domain is used where you have "path", and the username is not combined with the domain. Be sure to set your AuthenticationTypes properly, too. This can make or break the ability to authenticate.

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Does binding to LDAP require elevated privs (UAC)? You could try running Visual Studio and/or the app as Administrator and see if that helps. If that's the problem you could always add a manifest to the application and set it to require elevation, that way it will prompt when a user runs it.

Not sure why it would require elevated privs, but it's worth a shot.

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Running as an administrator does not help –  Michael G Dec 30 '08 at 17:47
add comment

I figured it out anyhow If you pass in the domain with the username on vista it does not work like "domain\user" so just passing "user" instead seems to work okay - except you have to be on the same domain

share|improve this answer
    
you should be able to change domain, by going user@domain as well –  Andrew Cox Dec 31 '08 at 15:04
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