Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hey guys, I've got a model that has an id that isn't unique. Each model also has a date. I would like to return all results but only the most recent of each row that shares ids. The model looks something like this:

class MyModel(models.Model):
    my_id = models.PositiveIntegerField()
    date  = models.DateTimeField()
    title = models.CharField(max_length=36)


## Add some entries
m1 = MyModel(my_id=1, date=yesterday, title='stop')
m1.save()

m2 = MyModel(my_id=1, date=today, title='go')
m2.save()

m3 = MyModel(my_id=2, date=today, title='hello')
m3.save()

Now try to retrieve these results:

MyModel.objects.all()... # then limit duplicate my_id's by most recent

Results should be only m2 and m3

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You won't be able to do this with just the ORM, you'll need to get all the records, and then discard the duplicates in Python.

For example:

objs = MyModel.objects.all().order_by("-date")
seen = set()
keep = []
for o in objs:
    if o.id not in seen:
        keep.append(o)
        seen.add(o.id)

Here's some custom SQL that can get what you want from the database:

select * from mymodel where (id, date) in (select id, max(date) from mymodel group by id)

You should be able to adapt this to use in the ORM.

share|improve this answer
    
As soon as you loop on the results, won't that evaluate the QuerySet and cause all the lookups? There's really no way to do it without? –  vfxcode Oct 24 '10 at 15:46
    
Relational databases (and therefore ORMs built on them) are not good at operations between rows (including comparisons). Their model is fundamentally about selecting a set of rows, and then sorting them. I can't think of a way to get SQL to do what you want.. –  Ned Batchelder Oct 24 '10 at 15:59
    
Ok, thanks for taking the time. I suppose I'll limit the results in other ways (like only getting recent results) to reduce the weight. Thanks again, Ned! –  vfxcode Oct 24 '10 at 16:09
    
Wait: I added some custom SQL to the answer. –  Ned Batchelder Oct 24 '10 at 16:15
    
Ooh thanks, I'll play with that a bit. –  vfxcode Oct 24 '10 at 16:56

You should also look into abstracting the logic above into a manager:

http://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/db/managers/

That way you can call something like MyModel.objects.no_dupes() where you would define no_dupes() in a manager and do the logic Ned laid out in there.

Your models.py would now look like this:

class MyModelManager(models.Manager):
    def no_dupes:
        objs = MyModel.objects.all().order_by("-date")
        seen = set()
        keep = []
        for o in objs:
            if o.id not in seen:
                keep.append(o)
                seen.add(o.id)
        return keep

class MyModel(models.Model):
    my_id = models.PositiveIntegerField()
    date  = models.DateTimeField()
    title = models.CharField(max_length=36)
    objects = MyModelManager()

With the above code in place, you can call: MyModel.objects.no_dupes(), this should give your desired result. Looks like you can even override the all() function as well if you would want that instead:

http://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.2/topics/db/managers/#modifying-initial-manager-querysets

I find the manager to be a better solution in case you will need to use this in more than one view across the project, this way you don't have to rewrite the code X number of times.

share|improve this answer
    
Whether I want to put the filtering in a custom manager or in the view, don't I still have to get ALL records and then filter them? I'd really like to filter before making the actual db calls if possible. Is this possible? –  vfxcode Oct 24 '10 at 15:50
    
You can modify the actual SQL query using managers. Look at the example here: docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/db/managers/… –  Sarkis Varozian Oct 24 '10 at 15:59
    
Thanks for the tip on Model Managers, I hadn't considered making a custom manager. –  vfxcode Oct 24 '10 at 16:10

As Ned says, I don't know of a way to do this with the ORM. But you might be able to use the db to restrict the amount of work you have to do in the for loop in python.

The idea is to use Django's annotate (which is basically running group_by) to find all the instances that have more than one row with the same my_id and process them as Ned suggests. Then for the remainder (which have no duplicates), you can just grab the individual rows.

from django.db.models import Count, Q
annotated_qs = MyModel.objects.annotate(num_my_ids=Count('my_id')).order_by('-date')
dupes = annotated_qs.filter(num_my_ids__gt=1)
uniques = annotated_qs.filter(num_my_ids__lte=1)
for dupe in dupes:
   ... # just keep the most recent, as Ned describes
keep_ids = [keep.id for keep in keeps]
latests = MyModel.objects.filter(Q(id__in=keep_ids) | Q(id__in=uniques))

If you only have a small number of dupes, this will mean that your for loop is much shorter, at the expense of an extra query (to get the dupes).

share|improve this answer
    
Count does not work this way. –  Aaron Merriam Mar 1 '13 at 23:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.