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  def find_users_online(count = 1)        
    users = Array.new
    count.times do 
      users += get_users_online
    end
    users # <==== I want to remove this here
  end  

In the code above im must put the "users" variable again at the end of the function to return the right value (users). But is it possible that the times block return the users values and I can remove "users" at the end of the function?

  def find_users_online(count = 1)        
    users = Array.new
    count.times.and_return do # <== something like this
      users += get_users_online
    end
  end  
share|improve this question
    
Because it's more readable or intuitive to have your "return indication" four lines before the end of the code? Imagine if your block were 100 lines long, how the hell would you be able to read it? –  Platinum Azure Oct 24 '10 at 16:01
    
Why would you want to call get_users_online multiple times? –  Jonas Elfström Oct 24 '10 at 16:14
2  
@Platinum: if his block were 100 lines long, he'd have bigger problems than this one... ;-) –  Mike Woodhouse Oct 24 '10 at 16:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Check out #tap. It's the new-fangled way to do "returning".

def find_users_online(count = 1)   
  [].tap do |users|
    count.times { users += get_users_online }
  end
end
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thanks, thats exactly that i'm looking for. But I must change the += to << that it works in my case –  ipsum Oct 24 '10 at 17:26

Lavir's solution is good if get_users_online will return the same value very time it is called. If not, you need something like this:

count.times.map {get_users_online}.flatten
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You will get array of arrays too. –  Lavir the Whiolet Oct 24 '10 at 16:22
    
with this solution is must write count.times.map { get_users_online }[0] because i'm getting an array in an array –  ipsum Oct 24 '10 at 16:27
    
That will result in following: [["User1", "User2"], ["User3", "User4"]] => ["User1", "User2"] –  Lavir the Whiolet Oct 24 '10 at 16:41
    
Oops, I forgot that get_users_online is returning an array. Thanks, and fixed. –  Wayne Conrad Oct 24 '10 at 16:56

Another option is returning block

  returning(users = Array.new) do |users|
      count.times { users += get_users_online }
  end
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Note that returning was removed (not even deprecated) in Rails 3 in favor of #tap. –  Jeremy Weiskotten Oct 24 '10 at 17:21
    
thanks for correcting me –  Deepak N Oct 24 '10 at 17:56

How about

def find_users_online(count = 1)
  (1..count).map{ get_users_online }.flatten
end

?

share|improve this answer
    
You will get array of arrays. –  Lavir the Whiolet Oct 24 '10 at 16:22
    
@Lavir: depends on what get_users_online returns, no? Adding .flatten would, I imagine, fix it if so. –  Mike Woodhouse Oct 24 '10 at 16:34
    
In the question there were "+=" but not "<<". That implies that "get_users_online()" returns array. –  Lavir the Whiolet Oct 24 '10 at 16:40
    
@Lavir. Ah. Indeed it does. Point taken. –  Mike Woodhouse Oct 24 '10 at 19:38
get_users_online * count

But get_users_online() must return the same value while executing this function.

If this is not your case then use

(1..count).map { get_users_online }.reduce(:+)

or using Facets:

count.of { get_users_online }.sum

There is also more interesting way:

(1..count).inject(Array.new) { |ignore, users| users + get_users_online }
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