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I have two constructors which feed values to readonly fields.

class Sample
{
    public Sample(string theIntAsString)
    {
        int i = int.Parse(theIntAsString);

        _intField = i;
    }

    public Sample(int theInt)
    {
        _intField = theInt;
    }


    public int IntProperty
    {
        get { return _intField; }
    }
    private readonly int _intField;

}

One constructor receives the values directly, the other does some calculation and obtains the values, then sets the fields.

Now here's the catch:

  1. I don't want to duplicate the setting code. In this case, just one field is set but of course there may well be more than one.
  2. To make the fields readonly, I need to set them from the constructor, so I can't "extract" the shared code to a utility function.
  3. I don't know how to call one constructor from another.

Any ideas?

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@nawfal: This question is far more popular that the one you linked to -- voted it to be the other way round –  krlmlr May 31 '13 at 17:59
1  
@krlmlr yes, but if both questions are worded equally well, I prefer the older to stay open - some fairness.. :) Doesn't matter which is closed... –  nawfal May 31 '13 at 18:01
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5 Answers

up vote 311 down vote accepted

Like this:

public Sample(string str) : this(int.Parse(str)) {
}
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3  
This is nice, especially if you get it. –  blizpasta Oct 24 '10 at 16:19
1  
Nice solution!! –  Jader Dias Oct 24 '10 at 22:06
1  
I get it, and I like it. The sample, however, was of course simplified. I wonder if I can put my complicated method in the "this". I'll try it. Thanks. –  Avi Oct 25 '10 at 7:58
18  
@Avi: You can make a static method that manipulates the parameters. –  SLaks Oct 25 '10 at 11:26
1  
May I know the execution order of this one? Everything in Sample(string) will be executed first then Sample(int) or the int version will be executed first then it will get back to the string version? (Like calling super() in Java?) –  Rosdi Kasim Dec 18 '13 at 16:49
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If what you want can't be achieved satisfactorily without having the initialization in its own method (e.g. because you want to do too much before the initialization code, or wrap it in a try-finally, or whatever) you can have any or all constructors pass the readonly variables by reference to an initialization routine, which will then be able to manipulate them at will.

class Sample
{
    private readonly int _intField;
    public int IntProperty
    {
        get { return _intField; }
    }

    void setupStuff(ref int intField, int newValue)
    {
        intField = newValue;
    }

    public Sample(string theIntAsString)
    {
        int i = int.Parse(theIntAsString);
        setupStuff(ref _intField,i);
    }

    public Sample(int theInt)
    {
        setupStuff(ref _intField, theInt);
    }
}
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3  
+1 real solution. Using base(...) or this(...) we can only perform very limited operations. –  shashwat Sep 17 '12 at 9:32
2  
Absolutely agree - the other solution works, but is just not the right way to do it (TM)! –  Charleh Oct 9 '12 at 10:33
    
How about using the out keyword instead of ref? –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Sep 13 '13 at 20:24
    
@JeppeStigNielsen: In this particular case it would likely be appropriate if the method only needed to store something there. On the other hand, the same approach could be used in cases where the caller would put something in the field and call a method that might or might not need to modify it; using out in the example might not make that clear. Also, I'm generally a bit skeptical of out, since there's no guarantee that an outside method with an out parameter will actually store anything there. –  supercat Sep 13 '13 at 20:35
    
Why ref? Why not avoid that parameter at all and let the setupStuff method directly set the member variable? –  nawfal Nov 9 '13 at 12:46
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before the body of the constructor, use either:

: base (parameters)

: this (parameters)

Example :-

public class People: User
{
   public People (int EmpID) : base (EmpID)
   {
      //Add more statements here.
   }
}
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1  
Unfortunately, does not work if I need some operations on arguments between constructors calls. –  Denis Jul 12 '13 at 17:01
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I am improving upon supercat's answer. I guess the following can also be done:

class Sample
{
    private readonly int _intField;
    public int IntProperty
    {
        get { return _intField; }
    }

    void setupStuff(ref int intField, int newValue)
    {
        //Do some stuff here based upon the necessary initialized variables.
        intField = newValue;
    }

    public Sample(string theIntAsString, bool? doStuff = true)
    {
        //Initialization of some necessary variables.
        //==========================================
        int i = int.Parse(theIntAsString);
        // ................
        // .......................
        //==========================================

        if (!doStuff.HasValue || doStuff.Value == true)
           setupStuff(ref _intField,i);
    }

    public Sample(int theInt): this(theInt, false) //"false" param to avoid setupStuff() being called two times
    {
        setupStuff(ref _intField, theInt);
    }
}
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1  
This would possibly allow a third party to create a Sample without setting it up, by calling new Sample(str, false). –  Teejay Oct 9 '13 at 9:53
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You can also call one constructor from other constructor's body. Like this :-

 public class FooBar()
 {
   public FooBar(string s)
    {
        Init1();
    }

public FooBar(int i)
  {
      Init2(); 
      Init1();
  }

}

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