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I have seen that such a function exists for BigInteger, i.e. BigInteger#gcd. Are there other functions in Java which also works for other types (int, long or Integer)? It seems this would make sense as java.lang.Math.gcd (with all kinds of overloads) but it is not there. Is it somewhere else?


(Don't confuse this question with "how do I implement this myself", please!)

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3  
Why is the accepted answer one that tells you how to implement it yourself - although wrapping an existing implementation? =) – djjeck Jan 18 '13 at 21:36
    
I agree with your observation. GCD should a class with a bunch of overloaded static methods that takes in two numbers and gives it's gcd. And it should be part of the java.math package. – anu May 12 '14 at 19:18

10 Answers 10

up vote 36 down vote accepted

For int and long, as primitives, not really. For Integer, it is possible someone wrote one.

Given that BigInteger is a (mathematical/functional) superset of int, Integer, long, and Long, if you need to use these types, convert them to a BigInteger, do the GCD, and convert the result back.

private static int gcdThing(int a, int b) {
    BigInteger b1 = new BigInteger(""+a); // there's a better way to do this. I forget.
    BigInteger b2 = new BigInteger(""+b);
    BigInteger gcd = b1.gcd(b2);
    return gcd.intValue();
}

The better way:

private static int gcdThing(int a, int b) {
    BigInteger b1 = BigInteger.valueOf(a);
    BigInteger b2 = BigInteger.valueOf(b);
    BigInteger gcd = b1.gcd(b2);
    return gcd.intValue();
}
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34  
BigInteger.valueOf(a).gcd(BigInteger.valueOf(b)).intValue() is much better. – Albert Oct 24 '10 at 18:15
    
valueOf()... cool, thanks. – Tony Ennis Oct 25 '10 at 0:02
    
Some benchmarks: stackoverflow.com/questions/21570890/… – Jona Christopher Sahnwaldt Mar 18 '15 at 18:54
2  
If this function is called often (i.e. millions of times) you shouldn't convert int or long to BigInteger. A function using only primitive values will likely be an order of magnitude faster. Check the other answers. – Jona Christopher Sahnwaldt Mar 24 '15 at 14:41
    
@Bhanu Pratap Singh To avoid casting or truncation, it's better to use separate methods for int and long. I edited the answer accordingly. – Jona Christopher Sahnwaldt Mar 24 '15 at 14:43

As far as I know, there isn't any built-in method for primitives. But something as simple as this should do the trick:

public int GCD(int a, int b) {
   if (b==0) return a;
   return GCD(b,a%b);
}

You can also one-line it if you're into that sort of thing:

public int GCD(int a, int b) { return b==0 ? a : GCD(b, a%b); }

It should be noted that there is absolutely no difference between the two as they compile to the same byte code.

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1  
This seems to work. If so, it's awesome, lol. – Tony Ennis Oct 24 '10 at 16:54
    
As far as I can tell it works fine. I just ran 100,000 random numbers though both methods and they agreed each time. – Tony Ennis Oct 24 '10 at 17:05
9  
It's Euclidean algorithm... It's very old and proven right. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euclidean_algorithm – Rekin Oct 24 '10 at 17:40
1  
@Albert, well you could always try it out with a generic type and see if it works. I dunno just a thought, but the algorithm is there for you to experiment with. As far as some standard library or class, I've never seen one. You will still need to specify when you create the object that it is an int, long, etc.. though. – Matt Oct 24 '10 at 18:19
1  
@Albert, well, although Matt provided an implementation, you yourself could make it work in a, as you put is, "more generic" way, no? :) – Bart Kiers Oct 24 '10 at 19:21

Or the Euclidean algorithm for calculating the GCD...

public int egcd(int a, int b) {
    if (a == 0)
        return b;

    while (b != 0) {
        if (a > b)
            a = a - b;
        else
            b = b - a;
    }

    return a;
}
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Just to clarify: This is absolutely not what I was asking for. – Albert Oct 24 '10 at 18:13
8  
In this case, you had not specified that you didn't want alternative implementations since one didn't exist. Only later did you edit your post not looking for implementations. I believe others had answered "no" more than adequately. – Xorlev Oct 24 '10 at 21:56
1  
Nice solution. +1 – Arulx Z May 14 '15 at 15:21

Jakarta Commons Math has exactly that.

ArithmeticUtils.gcd(int p, int q)

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Use Guava LongMath.gcd() and IntMath.gcd()

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Some implementations here are not working correctly if both numbers are negative. gcd(-12, -18) is 6, not -6.

So an absolute value should be returned, something like

public static int gcd(int a, int b) {
    if (b == 0) {
        return Math.abs(a);
    }
    return gcd(b, a % b);
}
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One edge case for this is if both a and b are Integer.MIN_VALUE, you'll get Integer.MIN_VALUE back as the result, which is negative. This may be acceptable. The problem being that gcd(-2^31, -2^31)=2^31, but 2^31 can't be expressed as an integer. – Michael Anderson Jul 1 at 2:14
    
I'd also recommend using if(a==0 || b==0) return Math.abs(a+b); so that the behaviour is truly symmetric for zero arguments. – Michael Anderson Jul 1 at 2:14

You can use this implementation of Binary GCD algorithm

public class BinaryGCD {

public static int gcd(int p, int q) {
    if (q == 0) return p;
    if (p == 0) return q;

    // p and q even
    if ((p & 1) == 0 && (q & 1) == 0) return gcd(p >> 1, q >> 1) << 1;

    // p is even, q is odd
    else if ((p & 1) == 0) return gcd(p >> 1, q);

    // p is odd, q is even
    else if ((q & 1) == 0) return gcd(p, q >> 1);

    // p and q odd, p >= q
    else if (p >= q) return gcd((p-q) >> 1, q);

    // p and q odd, p < q
    else return gcd(p, (q-p) >> 1);
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int p = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
    int q = Integer.parseInt(args[1]);
    System.out.println("gcd(" + p + ", " + q + ") = " + gcd(p, q));
}

}

From http://introcs.cs.princeton.edu/java/23recursion/BinaryGCD.java.html

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If you are using Java 1.5 or later then this is an iterative binary GCD algorithm which uses Integer.numberOfTrailingZeros() to reduce the number of checks and iterations required.

public class Utils {
    public static final int gcd( int a, int b ){
        // Deal with the degenerate case where values are Integer.MIN_VALUE
        // since -Integer.MIN_VALUE = Integer.MAX_VALUE+1
        if ( a == Integer.MIN_VALUE )
        {
            if ( b == Integer.MIN_VALUE )
                throw new IllegalArgumentException( "gcd() is greater than Integer.MAX_VALUE" );
            return 1 << Integer.numberOfTrailingZeros( Math.abs(b) );
        }
        if ( b == Integer.MIN_VALUE )
            return 1 << Integer.numberOfTrailingZeros( Math.abs(a) );

        a = Math.abs(a);
        b = Math.abs(b);
        if ( a == 0 ) return b;
        if ( b == 0 ) return a;
        int factorsOfTwoInA = Integer.numberOfTrailingZeros(a),
            factorsOfTwoInB = Integer.numberOfTrailingZeros(b),
            commonFactorsOfTwo = Math.min(factorsOfTwoInA,factorsOfTwoInB);
        a >>= factorsOfTwoInA;
        b >>= factorsOfTwoInB;
        while(a != b){
            if ( a > b ) {
                a = (a - b);
                a >>= Integer.numberOfTrailingZeros( a );
            } else {
                b = (b - a);
                b >>= Integer.numberOfTrailingZeros( b );
            }
        }
        return a << commonFactorsOfTwo;
    }
}

Unit test:

import java.math.BigInteger;
import org.junit.Test;
import static org.junit.Assert.*;

public class UtilsTest {
    @Test
    public void gcdUpToOneThousand(){
        for ( int x = -1000; x <= 1000; ++x )
            for ( int y = -1000; y <= 1000; ++y )
            {
                int gcd = Utils.gcd(x, y);
                int expected = BigInteger.valueOf(x).gcd(BigInteger.valueOf(y)).intValue();
                assertEquals( expected, gcd );
            }
    }

    @Test
    public void gcdMinValue(){
        for ( int x = 0; x < Integer.SIZE-1; x++ ){
            int gcd = Utils.gcd(Integer.MIN_VALUE,1<<x);
            int expected = BigInteger.valueOf(Integer.MIN_VALUE).gcd(BigInteger.valueOf(1<<x)).intValue();
            assertEquals( expected, gcd );
        }
    }
}
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Similar to MutableBigInteger.binaryGcd(int,int), unfortunately the latter is not accessible. But cool anyway! – j4n bur53 Mar 16 at 22:44

The % going to give us the gcd Between two numbers, it means:- % or mod of big_number/small_number are =gcd, and we write it on java like this big_number % small_number.

EX1: for two integers

  public static int gcd(int x1,int x2)
    {
        if(x1>x2)
        {
           if(x2!=0)
           {
               if(x1%x2==0)     
                   return x2;
                   return x1%x2;
                   }
           return x1;
           }
          else if(x1!=0)
          {
              if(x2%x1==0)
                  return x1;
                  return x2%x1;
                  }
        return x2;
        } 

EX2: for three integers

public static int gcd(int x1,int x2,int x3)
{

    int m,t;
    if(x1>x2)
        t=x1;
    t=x2;
    if(t>x3)
        m=t;
    m=x3;
    for(int i=m;i>=1;i--)
    {
        if(x1%i==0 && x2%i==0 && x3%i==0)
        {
            return i;
        }
    }
    return 1;
}
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2  
This is wrong, e.g. gcd(42, 30) should be 6 but it is 12 by your example. But 12 is not a divisor of 30 and neither of 42. You should call gcd recursively. See the answer by Matt or look on Wikipedia for the Euclidean algorithm. – Albert Nov 18 '13 at 10:28
int n1 = 12; // you can make the user insert n1,n2 using Scanner or JOptionPane
int n2 = 26;
int gcd = 1;
int k = 1;

while ((k <= n1) && (k <= n2)) {
    if ((n1 % k == 0) && (n2 % k == 0)) {
        gcd = k;
    }
    k++;
}

System.out.print("The Greatest Common divisor of The Two numbers IS :   " + gcd);
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3  
1. I explicitly said in my question that I don't search for an algorithm because I know how to implement it myself. 2. Your algorithm performs really bad. You should not do it like this! Compare it with the Euclidean algorithm and guess which one requires less steps for example for the numbers 100000 and 100001. – Albert Jan 23 '13 at 13:46
1  
1.I don't know you have seen my Answer or Not .but, it is NOT an algorithm.2.it is very simple answer and not slow ,you can try it. – user2003749 Jan 23 '13 at 14:23
4  
It is slow though. Maybe not on your two sample inputs, but it takes O(_value_ of the smaller number) which is terrible. Given that a better alternative has been known for literally millennia, I don't see why the equivalent of trial division is ever something you'd want. – Mysterious Dan Mar 15 '13 at 18:46

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