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I have path to a folder for example

/myfolder

or in Windows:

C:\myfolder

and I want to get a list of all files in that folder. How shall I do so in C?

Is it different in C++ or C99?

How can I get a list of its folders?

Any help is appreciated.

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2  
This question has nothing to do with C or C++ but with the OS that you are using. Please be more precise. –  Jens Gustedt Oct 24 '10 at 17:09
    
@Jens Uh? Where do you see the ambiguity? Plus it has a lot to do with C or C++. –  Let_Me_Be Oct 24 '10 at 17:13
3  
C as a language has IO on files, but doesn't even know the concept of directories. Directories are an OS concept, so to say anything useful to answer that question you'd have to know the OS. –  Jens Gustedt Oct 24 '10 at 18:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In POSIX operating systems, you can call opendir() and readdir(). In Windows you can call _findfirst() and _findnext(). With a little effort you can implement your own opendir() and readdir() as wrapper functions under Windows, so that your application code can use the same API everywhere. An example of that can be found here.

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You can use the functions declared in dirent.h

dirent.h is the header in the C POSIX library for the C programming language that contains constructs that facilitate directory traversing. The function is not part of the C standard, but is considered "pseudo-standard" and is usually portable between platforms.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dirent.h

#include <dirent.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    DIR *dir;
    struct dirent *de;

    dir = opendir("."); /*your directory*/
    while(dir)
    {
        de = readdir(dir);
        if (!de) break;
        printf("%i %s\n", de->d_type, de->d_name);
    }
    closedir(dir);
    return 0;
}
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Thanks......... –  AKGMA Nov 4 '10 at 7:38

The best approach in C++ is using boost filesystem.

As for C, you will need platform API (POSIX/WinAPI).

POSIX documentation + example: http://www.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009695399/functions/readdir.html

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This is classical task, one possiple solution maybe find in Kernigan & Ritchie - The C programming Language (Chapter 8.6). Essence of task is recursive traverse of target folder and its subfolders.

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Why was this down-voted? The answer is in this chapter in this book. I guess it was down-voted because you have to own a copy first? amazon.co.uk/C-Programming-Language-2nd/dp/0131103628 It's seriously worth buying if you're learning C. –  Gary Willoughby Nov 4 '10 at 17:00

Check out the get_all_files_within_folder() I wrote in C/C++ here, which I answered a similar question as yours. It works perfectly for me. Hope it helps.

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