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What are the key steps and tools it takes to creating a 3d video game.

For example, I understand that a 3d artist will create 3d models in 3d Studio Max, or Maya, but where do these models go from there? Are the 3d models first animated by a 3d animator in 3d Studio Max/Maya? Then do these models along with the animation loops get sent to the C++/Lua programmer?

When a programmer is programming the game, how do they see the effects of the code they are writing? Do they have Maya/ 3d Studio Max open as they are coding? OR do they have a 3d game engine open to view the results of their code tweaks?

Also, what are the languages that are currently considered industry standard for video game dev? C++, Lua? MS Visual Studio?

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Using 50 characters or less, please summarize the rise and fall of the Roman Empire. Seriously, you've just ask a half dozen different questions, each with a half dozen potential answers. –  mikerobi Oct 24 '10 at 18:56
    
@mikerobi I thought I would just drop all these questions with in the post to further illustrate the general question. So you suggest that I just ask these 6 or so questions separately? Is my original question too vague? –  pylonicon Oct 24 '10 at 23:15
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@J3M 7OR3, yes way too vague. The workflow is highly dependent on the game engine, the artist tools, team size, and other factors. If you want to get into 3D development the best thing you can do is to pick a game engine and start coding. I'm really not up on the latest developments in game tech, but Unity 3D looks like a great place to start. –  mikerobi Oct 25 '10 at 0:12
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check out Game Development as well, I think this question is more suited to that site –  Default Oct 25 '10 at 7:09
    
@Default Excellent. Thanks for pointing me there. @mikerobi I understand thanks for the advice. –  pylonicon Oct 26 '10 at 10:44

1 Answer 1

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Are the 3d models first animated by a 3d animator in 3d Studio Max/Maya?

Yes, often. There may also be motion capture which is typically cleaned up in this software too. The models and animations may be exported into an intermediate format and then conditioned, and converted to an ingame format. The exact process varies from studio, to studio and the tech base they utilize plays a big part in defining this process.

When a programmer is programming the game, how do they see the effects of the code they are writing?

Typically in the game or the engine they are working with. They may also work within a test framework which compares functionality and results with expected functionality and results. Doing this they can find problems and progress.

Also, what are the languages that are currently considered industry standard for video game dev? C++, Lua? MS Visual Studio?

There is no specific answer. For AAA studios they still use a lot of C and C++, in studios developing Casual titles you'll probably see more C#, Python and Java and other higher level languages. LUA is often used for scripting but is not generally used for the whole product, there are exceptions however.

Visual Studio is just an IDE. Yes it's very common, particularly because many plugins exist for using it when developing for PC, Xbox 360 or the Playstation.

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interesting and when you say AAA, do you mean the cream of the crop? –  pylonicon Oct 26 '10 at 10:48
    
Well it's one of silly marketing terms that CEOs use but I suppose it means the big, cutting edge, lastest technology, big budget, hoping for critical acclaim type game titles and studios. –  Montdidier Oct 27 '10 at 3:35
    
The reason C and C++ is still used in big budget titles is often for control (over how memory is used mostly), historical reasons and for widest portability. The Sony development environments still do not really easily support higher level languages than C and C++ without maintaining your own language infrastructure. You can use C and C++ on everything –  Montdidier Oct 27 '10 at 3:40
    
Montdidier So C/C++ = Faster speeds. Got it. –  pylonicon Oct 27 '10 at 17:13

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