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In C and many other languages, there is a continue keyword that, when used inside of a loop, jumps to the next iteration of the loop. Is there any equivalent of this continue keyword in Ruby?

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3  
continue doesn't "restart" the loops but jumps to the next iteration of the loop. –  Matt Crinklaw-Vogt Oct 24 '10 at 19:54
    
@mlaw: I edited my question accordingly to prevent future confusion. –  Mark Szymanski Oct 24 '10 at 21:19
3  
possible duplicate of In Ruby, how do I skip a loop in a .each loop, similiar to 'continue' –  dbr Dec 31 '11 at 9:32
1  
@dbr the duplicate you've found was asked after this one. –  Droogans Oct 22 '13 at 21:52
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6 Answers

up vote 317 down vote accepted

Yes, it's called next.

for i in 0..5
   if i < 2 then
      next
   end
   puts "Value of local variable is #{i}"
end

This outputs the following:

Value of local variable is 2
Value of local variable is 3
Value of local variable is 4
Value of local variable is 5
 => 0..5 
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2  
+1 - Thanks! Really appreciate the quick and easy description! –  Topher Fangio Oct 22 '11 at 22:09
1  
This is how I remember--Ruby respects Perl (next) above C (continue) –  Colonel Panic Jul 5 '12 at 18:43
1  
@ColonelPanic But pearls are found below the sea?! –  Chloe Dec 29 '13 at 4:48
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next

also, look at redo which redoes the current iteration.

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... cause ruby is rad like that. –  matt walters Feb 8 '13 at 22:36
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Ruby has two other loop/iteration control keywords: redo and retry. Read more about them, and the difference between them, at Ruby QuickTips.

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Inside for-loops and iterator methods like each and map the next keyword in ruby will have the effect of jumping to the next iteration of the loop (same as continue in C).

However what it actually does is just to return from the current block. So you can use it with any method that takes a block - even if it has nothing to do with iteration.

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as well as nice redo statement –  Sigurd Oct 24 '10 at 19:41
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A slightly more Ruby way of writing that example:

(1..4).each do |x|
  next if x == 2
  puts x
end

Outputs:

  1
  3
  4
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I think it is called next.

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