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foreach (var filter in filters)
{
    var filterType = typeof(Filters);
    var method = filterType.GetMethod(filter, BindingFlags.IgnoreCase | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static);
    if (method != null)
    {
        var parameters = method.GetParameters();
        Type paramType = parameters[0].GetType();
        value = (string)method.Invoke(null, new[] { value });
    }
}

How can I cast value to paramType? value is a string, paramType will probably just be a basic type like int, string, or maybe float. I'm cool with it throwing an exception if no conversion is possible.

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There's a bug in my code btw, should be parameters[0].ParameterType. What I wrote actually returns a ParameterInfo type. –  Mark Oct 24 '10 at 20:19
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3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

The types you are using all implement IConvertible. As such you can use ChangeType.

 value = Convert.ChangeType(method.Invoke(null, new[] { value }), paramType);
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I was looking in the Convert class, but I didn't see this. Thanks! –  Mark Oct 24 '10 at 20:18
    
Although I wanted to convert the input value, not the output value, but that's okay. –  Mark Oct 24 '10 at 20:30
    
Yes, the idea is the same. –  Aliostad Oct 24 '10 at 20:33
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You could go dynamic; for example:

using System;

namespace TypeCaster
{
    class Program
    {
        internal static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Parent p = new Parent() { name = "I am the parent", type = "TypeCaster.ChildA" };
            dynamic a = Convert.ChangeType(new ChildA(p.name), Type.GetType(p.type));
            Console.WriteLine(a.Name);

            p.type = "TypeCaster.ChildB";
            dynamic b = Convert.ChangeType(new ChildB(p.name), Type.GetType(p.type));
            Console.WriteLine(b.Name);
        }
    }

    internal class Parent
    {
        internal string type { get; set; }
        internal string name { get; set; }

        internal Parent() { }
    }

    internal class ChildA : Parent
    {
        internal ChildA(string name)
        {
            base.name = name + " in A";
        }

        public string Name
        {
            get { return base.name; }
        }
    }

    internal class ChildB : Parent
    {
        internal ChildB(string name)
        {
            base.name = name + " in B";
        }

        public string Name
        {
            get { return base.name; }
        }
    }
}
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Very close to an existing question. I think this will help you.

There are several ways you can create an object of a certain type on the fly, one is:

// determine type here
var type = typeof(MyClass);

// create an object of the type
var obj = (MyClass)Activator.CreateInstance(type);

And you'll get an instance of MyClass in obj.

Another way is to use reflection:

// get type information
var type = typeof(MyClass);

// get public constructors
var ctors = type.GetConstructors(BindingFlags.Public);

// invoke the first public constructor with no parameters.
var obj = ctors[0].Invoke(new object[] { });

And from one of ConstructorInfo returned, you can "Invoke()" it with arguments and get back an instance of the class as if you've used a "new" operator.

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This is basically a copy-paste from the referenced question. It's great that you referenced the original answer (and it helped me), but perhaps just referencing the original answer is ideal. There's more discussion there. Here is the direct link to the answer: stackoverflow.com/a/981344/354222 –  MushinNoShin Apr 22 at 23:59
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