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I have been writing a VBA macro that opens a HTML document within Excel (in order to perform various calculations on it). Excel will search for the HTML document within the current folder. If it can't find it there it will produce a file open box where the user can browse to the location of the HTML document manually. All good so far. However should the user select Cancel (rather than selecting a file), I want Excel to display a message and quit.

The message is produced but then the code stops with the following error:

Run-time error '424': Object required.

This doesn't sound like too much hassle, but I've been running into one brick wall after another trying to nail what is causing the problem.

The sub that just doesn't seem to work is:

Sub ExitWithoutPrompt()

MsgBox "You failed to select a file, therefore Excel will now close.  Please refer to the readme file."
Excel.Application.DisplayAlerts = False
Excel.Application.Quit

End Sub

I'm using MS Excel 2002, but I'm keen for the solution to work on as many variants of Excel as possible.

Any help gratefully received as to where I am going wrong. I'm a complete newbie by the way, so if at all possible please be long-winded with any guidance you might have for me...

As it might be of use included below (at the risk of making this post unwieldy) are the other two subs I am using in the macro:

First sub:

Sub Endurance()

Call OpenHTML

Range("G27").Value = "Category"
Range("G28").Value = "Meat"
Range("G29").Value = "Veg"
Range("G30").Value = "PRP"
Range("F27").Value = "Fleet"
Range("E27").Value = "Consumption"

Range("E32").Value = "Endurance"

Range("E33").Value = "Lowest Category"
Range("E34").Value = "Fleet"
Range("E35").Value = "Consumption"

Range("E27, F27, G27, E32").Font.Bold = True
Range("F28").Value = WorksheetFunction.Sum(Range("E8,E9,E11,E14,E21"))
Range("E28").Value = WorksheetFunction.Sum(Range("G8,G9,G11,G14,G21"))
Range("F29").Value = WorksheetFunction.Sum(Range("E10,E16"))
Range("E29").Value = WorksheetFunction.Sum(Range("G10,G16"))
Range("F30").Value = WorksheetFunction.Sum(Range("E20,E22"))
Range("E30").Value = WorksheetFunction.Sum(Range("G20,G22"))

Columns("E:F").EntireColumn.AutoFit

Range("G28:G30, E27, F27, G27, G33").Select
    With Selection
        .HorizontalAlignment = xlRight
    End With

Range("E27:G30, E32:G35").Select
    Selection.Borders(xlDiagonalDown).LineStyle = xlNone
    Selection.Borders(xlDiagonalUp).LineStyle = xlNone
    With Selection.Borders(xlEdgeLeft)
        .LineStyle = xlContinuous
        .Weight = xlThin
        .ColorIndex = xlAutomatic
    End With
    With Selection.Borders(xlEdgeTop)
        .LineStyle = xlContinuous
        .Weight = xlThin
        .ColorIndex = xlAutomatic
    End With
    With Selection.Borders(xlEdgeBottom)
        .LineStyle = xlContinuous
        .Weight = xlThin
        .ColorIndex = xlAutomatic
    End With
    With Selection.Borders(xlEdgeRight)
        .LineStyle = xlContinuous
        .Weight = xlThin
        .ColorIndex = xlAutomatic
    End With
    Selection.Borders(xlInsideVertical).LineStyle = xlNone
    Selection.Borders(xlInsideHorizontal).LineStyle = xlNone


Dim Endurance As Double
Endurance = WorksheetFunction.Min(Range("F28:F30"))
Range("G34").Value = WorksheetFunction.RoundDown(Endurance, 0)

Endurance = WorksheetFunction.Min(Range("E28:E30"))
Range("G35").Value = WorksheetFunction.RoundDown(Endurance, 0)

Range("G33").Value = Endurance

Dim LowCat As String

LowCat = WorksheetFunction.VLookup(Endurance, Range("E28:G30"), 3, False)
Range("G33").Value = LowCat

ActiveSheet.PageSetup.PrintArea = "$A$1:$G$35"
ActiveSheet.PageSetup.Orientation = xlLandscape

Range("G36").Select

If MsgBox("Print endurance statement?", vbYesNo + vbDefaultButton2, "Print endurance") = vbYes Then
    ActiveWindow.SelectedSheets.PrintOut Copies:=1
    Else
    Range("G36").Select
    End If


End Sub

And the second sub:

Sub OpenHTML()

On Error GoTo MissingFile

Workbooks.Open FileName:=ThisWorkbook.Path & "\TRICAT Endurance Summary.html"


Exit Sub

MissingFile:

Dim Finfo As String
Dim FilterIndex As Integer
Dim Title As String
Dim FileName As Variant

' Set up list of file filters
Finfo = "HTML Files (*.html),*.html," & _
        "All Files (*.*),*.*,"

' Display *.html by default
    FilterIndex = 1

' Set the dialog box caption
Title = "Select TRICAT Endurance Summary"

' Get the filename
FileName = Application.GetOpenFilename(FInfor, FilterIndex, Title)

' Handle Return info from dialog box
If FileName = False Then
    Call ExitWithoutPrompt
    Else
    MsgBox "You selected" & FileName
    Workbooks.Open FileName

End If

End Sub

If you've got this far, thanks for reading....

share|improve this question
    
Which line is causing the error? Usually VBA for Excel's debugger will tell you. –  Brian Dec 30 '08 at 18:31
    
Thanks for providing all the code and a very complete description of your problem! –  Blackhawk Mar 24 at 14:17
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Add a call to ActiveWorkbook.Close to ExitWithoutPrompt:

Sub ExitWithoutPrompt()
    MsgBox "You failed to select a file, therefore Excel will now close.  Please refer to the readme file."
    Excel.Application.DisplayAlerts = False
    Excel.Application.Quit
    ActiveWorkbook.Close False
End Sub

This works for me under Excel 2003.

For some reason, the order of calling Application.Quit and ActiveWorkbook.Close is important. Counter-intuitively, at least to me, if you call ActiveWorkbook.Close before Application.Quit you still get the error.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow. I've literally been googling that for ages and all it needed was one line. Thanks for your help, very grateful. –  Gene Dec 30 '08 at 22:54
    
To be honest, I just stumbled upon it. I was thinking that you'd have to close the workbook first, so I added the ActiveWorkbook.Close call before Quit. That didn't work, so I played around a bit and got this to work. I can't explain why though... –  Patrick Cuff Dec 30 '08 at 22:57
    
Clearly directed stumbling though, as opposed to blind stumbling like myself. You are a star. –  Gene Dec 30 '08 at 23:00
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