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I was wondering if there is a Parallel.For equivalent to the .net version for Java?

If there is could someone please supply an example? thanks!

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3  
Perhaps you could provide a link to reference for Parallel.for? I couldn't easily find any and not every java developer knows about .net? –  Sean Patrick Floyd Oct 24 '10 at 20:24
    
@seanizer: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd997425.aspx –  Kirk Woll Oct 24 '10 at 20:25
    
    
@kirk ??? can't find Parallel.for in any of the listings... @Emil thks, I guess I get it now –  Sean Patrick Floyd Oct 24 '10 at 20:28
    
Edited in Kirk's link –  Donal Fellows Oct 24 '10 at 20:33

9 Answers 9

up vote 64 down vote accepted

I guess the closest thing would be:

ExecutorService exec = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(SOME_NUM_OF_THREADS);
try {
    for (final Object o : list) {
        exec.submit(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                // do stuff with o.
            }
        });
    }
} finally {
    exec.shutdown();
}

Based on TheLQ's comments, you would set SUM_NUM_THREADS to Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors();

Edit: Decided to add a basic "Parallel.For" implementation

public class Parallel {
    private static final int NUM_CORES = Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors();

    private static final ExecutorService forPool = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(NUM_CORES * 2, new NamedThreadFactory("Parallel.For"));

    public static <T> void For(final Iterable<T> elements, final Operation<T> operation) {
        try {
            // invokeAll blocks for us until all submitted tasks in the call complete
            forPool.invokeAll(createCallables(elements, operation));
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public static <T> Collection<Callable<Void>> createCallables(final Iterable<T> elements, final Operation<T> operation) {
        List<Callable<Void>> callables = new LinkedList<Callable<Void>>();
        for (final T elem : elements) {
            callables.add(new Callable<Void>() {
                @Override
                public Void call() {
                    operation.perform(elem);
                    return null;
                }
            });
        }

        return callables;
    }

    public static interface Operation<T> {
        public void perform(T pParameter);
    }
}

Example Usage of Parallel.For

// Collection of items to process in parallel
Collection<Integer> elems = new LinkedList<Integer>();
for (int i = 0; i < 40; ++i) {
    elems.add(i);
}
Parallel.For(elems, 
 // The operation to perform with each item
 new Parallel.Operation<Integer>() {
    public void perform(Integer param) {
        System.out.println(param);
    };
});

I guess this implementation is really more similar to Parallel.ForEach

Edit I put this up on GitHub if anyone is interested. Parallel For on GitHub

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1  
+1 for a solution for current systems… –  Donal Fellows Oct 24 '10 at 20:34
1  
Yea, you could easily pass a Anonymous class to a method that does the work for you. Could even add a CountDownLatch and have each run() deincriment it so that you can have it block. The only issue is that you don't know the number of cores a computer has, so you can't optimize the number of threads for the cores. –  TheLQ Oct 24 '10 at 20:41
    
You can have the following to drop the extra obj reference: for (final Object o : list) { –  Peter Lawrey Oct 24 '10 at 23:36
1  
@jocull - I added an example. Thanks for the suggestion. –  Matt Crinklaw-Vogt Oct 23 '12 at 0:57
1  
Consider using Executors.newCachedThreadPool() to share the thread pool. That way if you are doing this in multiple places you won't be creating multiple thread pools that try to use all of the processors. –  dcstraw Apr 23 '13 at 19:51

MLaw's solution is a very practical Parallel.ForEach. I added a bit modification to make a Parallel.For.

public class Parallel
{
static final int iCPU = Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors();

public static <T> void ForEach(Iterable <T> parameters,
                   final LoopBody<T> loopBody)
{
    ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(iCPU);
    List<Future<?>> futures  = new LinkedList<Future<?>>();

    for (final T param : parameters)
    {
        Future<?> future = executor.submit(new Runnable()
        {
            public void run() { loopBody.run(param); }
        });

        futures.add(future);
    }

    for (Future<?> f : futures)
    {
        try   { f.get(); }
        catch (InterruptedException e) { } 
        catch (ExecutionException   e) { }         
    }

    executor.shutdown();     
}

public static void For(int start,
                   int stop,
               final LoopBody<Integer> loopBody)
{
    ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(iCPU);
    List<Future<?>> futures  = new LinkedList<Future<?>>();

    for (int i=start; i<stop; i++)
    {
        final Integer k = i;
        Future<?> future = executor.submit(new Runnable()
        {
            public void run() { loopBody.run(k); }
        });     
        futures.add(future);
    }

    for (Future<?> f : futures)
    {
        try   { f.get(); }
        catch (InterruptedException e) { } 
        catch (ExecutionException   e) { }         
    }

    executor.shutdown();     
}
}

public interface LoopBody <T>
{
    void run(T i);
}

public class ParallelTest
{
int k;  

public ParallelTest()
{
    k = 0;
    Parallel.For(0, 10, new LoopBody <Integer>()
    {
        public void run(Integer i)
        {
            k += i;
            System.out.println(i);          
        }
    });
    System.out.println("Sum = "+ k);
}

public static void main(String [] argv)
{
    ParallelTest test = new ParallelTest();
}
}
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I merged your unregistered accounts. Please consider associating an OpenID with this account to avoid losing your cookie (and access to posts you own) in the future. –  Tim Post Mar 15 '12 at 8:33

Fork join framework in Java 7 is for concurrency support. But I don't know about an exact equivalent for Parallel.For.

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Built upon mlaw suggestion, add CountDownLatch. Add chunksize to reduce submit().

When tested with 4 million items array, this one gives 5X speed up over sequential for() on my Core i7 2630QM CPU.

public class Loop {
    public interface Each {
        void run(int i);
    }

    private static final int CPUs = Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors();

    public static void withIndex(int start, int stop, final Each body) {
        int chunksize = (stop - start + CPUs - 1) / CPUs;
        int loops = (stop - start + chunksize - 1) / chunksize;
        ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(CPUs);
        final CountDownLatch latch = new CountDownLatch(loops);
        for (int i=start; i<stop;) {
            final int lo = i;
            i += chunksize;
            final int hi = (i<stop) ? i : stop;
            executor.submit(new Runnable() {
                public void run() {
                    for (int i=lo; i<hi; i++)
                        body.run(i);
                    latch.countDown();
                }
            });
        }
        try {
            latch.await();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {}
        executor.shutdown();
    }

    public static void main(String [] argv) {
        Loop.withIndex(0, 9, new Loop.Each() {
            public void run(int i) {
                System.out.println(i*10);
            }
        });
    }
}
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A simpler option would be

// A thread pool which runs for the life of the application.
private static final ExecutorService EXEC = 
    Executors.newFixedThreadPool(SOME_NUM_OF_THREADS); 

//later 
EXEC.invokeAll(tasks); // you can optionally specify a timeout.
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There is a equivalent for Parallel.For available as a java extension. It is called Ateji PX, they have a free version you can play with. http://www.ateji.com/px/index.html

It is the exact equivalent of parallel.for and looks similar to.

For ||

More examples and explaination on wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ateji_PX

Closed thing in Java IMO

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Here is my contribution to this topic https://github.com/pablormier/parallel-loops. The usage is very simple:

Collection<String> upperCaseWords = 
    Parallel.ForEach(words, new Parallel.F<String, String>() {
        public String apply(String s) {
            return s.toUpperCase();
        }
    });

It's also possible to change some behaviour aspects, like the number of threads (by default it uses a cached thread pool):

Collection<String> upperCaseWords = 
            new Parallel.ForEach<String, String>(words)
                .withFixedThreads(4)
                .apply(new Parallel.F<String, String>() {
                    public String apply(String s) {
                        return s.toUpperCase();
                    }
                }).values();

All the code is self-contained in one java class and has no more dependencies than the JDK. I also encourage you to check the new way to parallelize in a functional-style way with Java 8

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I have an updated Java Parallel class which can do Parallel.For, Parallel.ForEach, Parallel.Tasks, and partitioned parallel loop. Source code is as follows:

Examples of using those parallel loops are the following:

public static void main(String [] argv)
{
    //sample data
    final ArrayList<String> ss = new ArrayList<String>();

    String [] s = {"a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g"};
    for (String z : s) ss.add(z);
    int m = ss.size();

    //parallel-for loop
    System.out.println("Parallel.For loop:");
    Parallel.For(0, m, new LoopBody<Integer>()
    {
        public void run(Integer i)
        {
           System.out.println(i +"\t"+ ss.get(i));   
        }       
    });   

   //parallel for-each loop
   System.out.println("Parallel.ForEach loop:");
   Parallel.ForEach(ss, new LoopBody<String>()
   {
       public void run(String p)
       {
           System.out.println(p);               
       }       
   });

   //partitioned parallel loop
   System.out.println("Partitioned Parallel loop:");
   Parallel.ForEach(Parallel.create(0, m), new LoopBody<Partition>()
   {
       public void run(Partition p)
       {
           for(int i=p.start; i<p.end; i++)
               System.out.println(i +"\t"+ ss.get(i));
       }
   });

   //parallel tasks
   System.out.println("Parallel Tasks:");
   Parallel.Tasks(new Task []
   {
       //task-1
       new Task() {public void run()
       {
           for(int i=0; i<3; i++)
               System.out.println(i +"\t"+ ss.get(i));
       }},

       //task-2
       new Task() {public void run()
       {
           for (int i=3; i<6; i++)
               System.out.println(i +"\t"+ ss.get(i));
       }}   
   });
}
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1  
It would be cool if you put your modified source on GitHub or something! –  jocull Oct 23 '12 at 18:00

Synchronization often kills the speedup of parallel for-loops. Therefore, parallel for-loops often need their private data and a reduction mechanism to reduce all threads private data to comprise a single result.

So I've extended the Parallel.For version of Weimin Xiao by a reduction mechanism.

public class Parallel {
public static interface IntLoopBody {
    void run(int i);
}

public static interface LoopBody<T> {
    void run(T i);
}

public static interface RedDataCreator<T> {
    T run();
}

public static interface RedLoopBody<T> {
    void run(int i, T data);
}

public static interface Reducer<T> {
    void run(T returnData, T addData);
}

private static class ReductionData<T> {
    Future<?> future;
    T data;
}

static final int nCPU = Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors();

public static <T> void ForEach(Iterable <T> parameters, final LoopBody<T> loopBody) {
    ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(nCPU);
    List<Future<?>> futures  = new LinkedList<Future<?>>();

    for (final T param : parameters) {
        futures.add(executor.submit(() -> loopBody.run(param) ));
    }

    for (Future<?> f : futures) {
        try { 
            f.get();
        } catch (InterruptedException | ExecutionException e) { 
            System.out.println(e); 
        }
    }
    executor.shutdown();     
}

public static void For(int start, int stop, final IntLoopBody loopBody) {
    final int chunkSize = (stop - start + nCPU - 1)/nCPU;
    final int loops = (stop - start + chunkSize - 1)/chunkSize;
    ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(loops);
    List<Future<?>> futures  = new LinkedList<Future<?>>();

    for (int i=start; i < stop; ) {
        final int iStart = i;
        i += chunkSize;
        final int iStop = (i < stop) ? i : stop;

        futures.add(executor.submit(() -> {
            for (int j = iStart; j < iStop; j++) 
                loopBody.run(j);
        }));     
    }

    for (Future<?> f : futures) {
        try { 
            f.get();
        } catch (InterruptedException | ExecutionException e) { 
            System.out.println(e); 
        }
    }
    executor.shutdown();     
}

public static <T> void For(int start, int stop, T result, final RedDataCreator<T> creator, final RedLoopBody<T> loopBody, final Reducer<T> reducer) {
    final int chunkSize = (stop - start + nCPU - 1)/nCPU;
    final int loops = (stop - start + chunkSize - 1)/chunkSize;
    ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(loops);
    List<ReductionData<T>> redData  = new LinkedList<ReductionData<T>>();

    for (int i = start; i < stop; ) {
        final int iStart = i;
        i += chunkSize;
        final int iStop = (i < stop) ? i : stop;
        final ReductionData<T> rd = new ReductionData<T>();

        rd.data = creator.run();
        rd.future = executor.submit(() -> {
            for (int j = iStart; j < iStop; j++) {
                loopBody.run(j, rd.data);
            }
        });
        redData.add(rd);
    }

    for (ReductionData<T> rd : redData) {
        try { 
            rd.future.get();
            if (rd.data != null) {
                reducer.run(result, rd.data);
            }
        } catch (InterruptedException | ExecutionException e) { 
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
    executor.shutdown();     
}
}

Here is a simple test example: a parallel character counter using a non-synchronized map.

import java.util.*;

public class ParallelTest {
static class Counter {
    int cnt;

    Counter() {
        cnt = 1;
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String text = "More formally, if this map contains a mapping from a key k to a " + 
            "value v such that key compares equal to k according to the map's ordering, then " +
            "this method returns v; otherwise it returns null.";
    Map<Character, Counter> charCounter1 = new TreeMap<Character, Counter>();
    Map<Character, Counter> charCounter2 = new TreeMap<Character, Counter>();

    // first sequentially
    for(int i=0; i < text.length(); i++) {
        char c = text.charAt(i);
        Counter cnt = charCounter1.get(c);
        if (cnt == null) {
            charCounter1.put(c, new Counter());
        } else {
            cnt.cnt++;
        }
    }
    for(Map.Entry<Character, Counter> entry: charCounter1.entrySet()) {
        System.out.println(entry.getKey() + ": " + entry.getValue().cnt);
    }

    // now parallel without synchronization
    Parallel.For(0, text.length(), charCounter2,
        // Creator
        () -> new TreeMap<Character, Counter>(), 
        // Loop Body
        (i, map) -> {
            char c = text.charAt(i);
            Counter cnt = map.get(c);
            if (cnt == null) {
                map.put(c, new Counter());
            } else {
                cnt.cnt++;
            }
        }, 
        // Reducer
        (result, map) -> {
            for(Map.Entry<Character, Counter> entry: charCounter1.entrySet()) {
                Counter cntR = result.get(entry.getKey());
                if (cntR == null) {
                    result.put(entry.getKey(), entry.getValue());
                } else {
                    cntR.cnt += entry.getValue().cnt;
                }
            }
        }
    );

    // compare results
    assert charCounter1.size() == charCounter2.size() : "wrong size: " + charCounter1.size() + ", " + charCounter2.size();
    Iterator<Map.Entry<Character, Counter>> it2 = charCounter2.entrySet().iterator();
    for(Map.Entry<Character, Counter> entry: charCounter1.entrySet()) {
        Map.Entry<Character, Counter> entry2 = it2.next();
        assert entry.getKey() == entry2.getKey() && entry.getValue() == entry2.getValue() : "wrong content";
    }

    System.out.println("Well done!");
}
}
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