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I know this will give me the day of the month as a number (11, 21, 23):

SimpleDateFormat formatDayOfMonth = new SimpleDateFormat("d");

But how do you format the day of the month to say 11th, 21st or 23rd in Java?

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6  
For reference these are called ordinal numbers - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ordinal_number_(linguistics). –  EmacsFodder Oct 25 '10 at 1:23
2  
Just for the record, anything constructing the response instead of looking up the whole answer in a table is close to impossible to localize to other languages. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Oct 25 '10 at 2:58
    
The answer is somehow incorrect have a look at my answer plz. –  J888 Jul 31 '13 at 3:15

9 Answers 9

up vote 49 down vote accepted
// http://code.google.com/p/guava-libraries
import static com.google.common.base.Preconditions.*;

String getDayOfMonthSuffix(final int n) {
    checkArgument(n >= 1 && n <= 31, "illegal day of month: " + n);
    if (n >= 11 && n <= 13) {
        return "th";
    }
    switch (n % 10) {
        case 1:  return "st";
        case 2:  return "nd";
        case 3:  return "rd";
        default: return "th";
    }
}

The table from @kaliatech is nice, but since the same information is repeated, it opens the chance for a bug. Such a bug actually exists in the table for 7tn, 17tn, and 27tn (this bug might get fixed as time goes on because of the fluid nature of StackOverflow, so check the version history on the answer to see the error).

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10  
"12nd"? "13rd"? This isn't sufficient. –  Mark Elliot Oct 25 '10 at 0:51
1  
You beat me to it! Thanks! –  Greg Mattes Oct 25 '10 at 0:51
3  
A simple guard clause catches the 3 special cases. –  Greg Mattes Oct 25 '10 at 0:55
12  
it really feels like an oversight in the simple data format, doesn't it? –  stevevls Dec 11 '11 at 14:11
5  
I am floored that this isn't built-in... –  jahroy Jul 16 '13 at 20:50

There is nothing in JDK to do this.

  static String[] suffixes =
  //    0     1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8     9
     { "th", "st", "nd", "rd", "th", "th", "th", "th", "th", "th",
  //    10    11    12    13    14    15    16    17    18    19
       "th", "th", "th", "th", "th", "th", "th", "th", "th", "th",
  //    20    21    22    23    24    25    26    27    28    29
       "th", "st", "nd", "rd", "th", "th", "th", "th", "th", "th",
  //    30    31
       "th", "st" };

 Date date = new Date();
 SimpleDateFormat formatDayOfMonth  = new SimpleDateFormat("d");
 int day = Integer.parseInt(formatDateOfMonth.format(date));
 String dayStr = day + suffixes[day];

I didn't run this through a compiler, so might be errors, but you get the idea.

EDIT: I saw some quick down votes at first. Probably because of the perceived inefficiencies. Same thing, but less likely to offend:

 Date date = new Date();
 int day = Calendar.getInstance().setTime(date).get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);
 String dayStr = day + suffixes[day];
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1  
The suffixes for all the '7' dates probably should be "th" instead of "tn"... :) –  jwaddell Oct 25 '10 at 0:36
1  
Thanks. Edited to fix the sevens. See Greg Mattes answer in this question as well. His approach trades memory for CPU (very minor in both cases), and his solution results in arguably more elegant code. –  kaliatech Oct 25 '10 at 1:12
3  
If you let the table contain the full "21st", "23rd", "29th" it can be externalized and localized to other languages. For successful software that may become a requirement. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Oct 25 '10 at 2:59
private String getCurrentDateInSpecificFormat(Calendar currentCalDate) {
    String dayNumberSuffix = getDayNumberSuffix(currentCalDate.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH));
    DateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat(" d'" + dayNumberSuffix + "' MMMM yyyy");
    return dateFormat.format(currentCalDate.getTime());
}

private String getDayNumberSuffix(int day) {
    if (day >= 11 && day <= 13) {
        return "th";
    }
    switch (day % 10) {
    case 1:
        return "st";
    case 2:
        return "nd";
    case 3:
        return "rd";
    default:
        return "th";
    }
}
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Thanks for the logic, its working :) –  Srinivas G Sep 4 '12 at 9:54
    
Works for me just edited so it gets its own instance of calender and takes the string format of day instead awesome thanks –  SatanEnglish Jan 30 at 22:14
String ordinal(int num)
{
  string[] suffix = ['th', 'st', 'nd', 'rd', 'th', 'th', 'th', 'th', 'th', 'th'];
  int m = num % 100;
  return String(num) + suffix[(m > 10 && m < 20) ? 0 : (m % 10)];
}
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There is a simpler and sure way of doing this. The function you'll need to use is getDateFromDateString(dateString); It basically removes the st/nd/rd/th off of a date string and simply parses it. You can change your SimpleDateFormat to anything and this will work.

public static final SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("d");
public static final Pattern p = Pattern.compile("([0-9]+)(st|nd|rd|th)");

private static Date getDateFromDateString(String dateString) throws ParseException {
     return sdf.parse(deleteOrdinal(dateString));
}

private static String deleteOrdinal(String dateString) {
    Matcher m = p.matcher(dateString);
    while (m.find()) {
        dateString = dateString.replaceAll(Matcher.quoteReplacement(m.group(0)), m.group(1));
    }
    return dateString;

}

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Only issue with the solution provided by Greg is that it does not account for number greater than 100 with the "teen" numbers ending. For example, 111 should be 111th, not 111st. This is my solution:

/**
 * Return ordinal suffix (e.g. 'st', 'nd', 'rd', or 'th') for a given number
 * 
 * @param value
 *           a number
 * @return Ordinal suffix for the given number
 */
public static String getOrdinalSuffix( int value )
{
    int hunRem = value % 100;
    int tenRem = value % 10;

    if ( hunRem - tenRem == 10 )
    {
        return "th";
    }
    switch ( tenRem )
    {
    case 1:
        return "st";
    case 2:
        return "nd";
    case 3:
        return "rd";
    default:
        return "th";
    }
}
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2  
In what case would a Day Month sequence have more than 31 days?? –  SatanEnglish Jan 30 at 21:58

The following is a more efficient answer to the question rather than hard-coding the style.

To change the day to ordinal number you need to use the following suffix.

DD +     TH = DDTH  result >>>> 4TH

OR to spell the number add SP to the format

DD + SPTH = DDSPTH   result >>> FOURTH

Find my completed answer in this question.

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Because most countries don't use the format "October 24th, 2010," that functionality was never incorporated into most programming languages. There are workarounds, however. You can break up the two-digit day and use the last digit inside of a switch statement.

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You have to switch on both digits; for example 1 -> 1st, 11 -> 11th. –  Stephen C Oct 25 '10 at 0:27
public String getDaySuffix(int inDay)
{
  String s = String.valueOf(inDay);

  if (s.endsWith("1"))
  {
    return "st";
  }
  else if (s.endsWith("2"))
  {
    return "nd";
  }
  else if (s.endsWith("3"))
  {
    return "rd";
  }
  else
  {
    return "th";
  }
}
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1  
Your code gives "st" even for 11th. –  Srinivas Jan 14 '13 at 5:00
    
And "12nd" for "12th". –  Emrakul Jan 14 '13 at 5:02

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