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would it be legal to sell a qt/c++ application (lgpl) without buying a license? And would doing the same but with pyqt(GPL) be legal? If it's not, should I explicitely tell the customer (It's an specific application for only a few customers) It's license, I don't think he/she would understand a thing. And I guess we will install the software ourselves on their computer, so Where I should put the source?

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3 Answers 3

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would it be legal to sell a qt/c++ application (lgpl) without buying a license? And would doing the same but with pyqt(GPL) be legal?

Yes and yes. The GPL doesn't prohibit to sell your software. The whole point of using the LGPL basically is that, in contrast to the GPL, you don't need to provide the source code of your software to the third party.

And I guess we will install the software ourselves on their computer, so Where I should put the source?

You don't need to put the source anywhere specific. You just have to provide your client a way to obtain the source, e. g. by asking you to send it to them on demand. You could also just give him the source code archive and you're done.

Just make sure you give him the license text in some way, e. g. bundle it with the software, show it on installation or make a menu item in the "Help" menu showing the license text. If your client doesn't care for it, that's fine.

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Note that with the GPL the customer not only has the right to have the source code, they also have the right to modify and redistribute it without paying you any further fees. Hence you won't find it easy building a business that way. However with the LGPL your own code can remain proprietary, you only have to provide source if you modify the LGPL licensed components themselves. –  Simon Hibbs Oct 25 '10 at 10:52

Of course you can sell it. GPL doesn't state that the software needs to be free (as in beer), but you need to give out the source code (or the possibility to obtain the source) as well as the binaries. For the last question, you don't need to put the source on the customer's computer, you can for instance give them a link to the source code on a website or revision control repository.

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Thanks, but 1 more question, do I actually have to tell him it's open-source? I guess not since he would'nt understand, but just to have peace of mind of not doing anything wrong –  user363834 Oct 25 '10 at 6:45
    
Using LGPL, you can keep your software closed-source. There are exceptions though, e.g. when linking statically. Using the GPL version of PyQt, you have to either release your code under a Free Software license or obtain a PyQt commercial license. If in doubt, don't trust neither me nor anyone else in forums, but consult a lawyer ;) –  Frank Osterfeld Oct 25 '10 at 7:32

@joschi,

You don't need to put the source anywhere specific. You just have to provide your client a way to obtain the source, e. g. by asking you to send it to them on demand. You could also just give him the source code archive and you're done.

You wrote in above post, what I am saying is as below.

For ex. I download GPL package, and modified it little as per the client demand, Now I am selling the software to the client, do I need to point my client to how to obtain source code or I have to provide him/her modified source code? if he/she demans?

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