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Why are static indexers disallowed in C#? I see no reason why they should not be allowed and furthermore they could be very useful.

For example:

static class ConfigurationManager {

        public object this[string name]{
            get{
                return ConfigurationManager.getProperty(name);
            }
            set {
                ConfigurationManager.editProperty(name, value);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// This will write the value to the property. Will overwrite if the property is already there
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="name">Name of the property</param>
        /// <param name="value">Value to be wrote (calls ToString)</param>
        public static void editProperty(string name, object value) {
            DataSet ds = new DataSet();
            FileStream configFile = new FileStream("./config.xml", FileMode.OpenOrCreate);
            ds.ReadXml(configFile);

            if (ds.Tables["config"] == null) {
                ds.Tables.Add("config");
            }

            DataTable config = ds.Tables["config"];

            if (config.Rows[0] == null) {
                config.Rows.Add(config.NewRow());
            }

            if (config.Columns[name] == null) {
                config.Columns.Add(name);
            }

            config.Rows[0][name] = value.ToString();

            ds.WriteXml(configFile);
            configFile.Close();
        }

        public static void addProperty(string name, object value) {
            ConfigurationManager.editProperty(name, value);
        }

        public static object getProperty(string name) {
            DataSet ds = new DataSet();
            FileStream configFile = new FileStream("./config.xml", FileMode.OpenOrCreate);
            ds.ReadXml(configFile);
            configFile.Close();


            if (ds.Tables["config"] == null) {
                return null;
            }

            DataTable config = ds.Tables["config"];

            if (config.Rows[0] == null) {
                return null;
            }

            if (config.Columns[name] == null) {
                return null;
            }

            return config.Rows[0][name];
        }
    }

The above code would benefit greatly from a static indexer. However it won't compile because static indexers are not allowed. Why is this so?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 32 down vote accepted

Indexer notation requires a reference to this. Since static methods don't have an reference to a particular instance of the class, you can't use this with them, and consequently you can't use indexer notation on static methods.

The solution to your problem is using a singleton pattern as follows:


    public class Utilities
    {
        static ConfigurationManager _configurationManager = new ConfigurationManager();
        public static ConfigurationManager ConfigurationManager
        {
            get
            {
                return _configurationManager;
            }
        }
    }

    public class ConfigurationManager
    {
        public object this[string value]
        {
            get
            {
                return new object();
            }
            set
            {
                // set something
            }
        }
    }

Now you can call Utilities.ConfigurationManager["someKey"] using indexer notation.

share|improve this answer
50  
But why does the indexer have to use 'this'? It doesn't have to access instance data –  Malfist Dec 30 '08 at 19:49
34  
+1 for Malfist's comment. Just because it uses "this" for an instance indexer doesn't mean they couldn't come up with other syntax. –  Jon Skeet Dec 30 '08 at 20:19
17  
Agreed. You are begging the question. You've basically said the reason it's not allowed is because it's not allowed. -1 because the question was "why is it not allowed?" –  xr280xr Nov 9 '12 at 20:39
1  
This is not the answer you're looking for. Move along. –  kjbartel Sep 17 at 0:21
1  
@xr280xr +1 For correct use of "begging the question" :) Plus I have the same complaint. –  RedFilter Dec 17 at 19:04

I believe it was considered not to be terribly useful. I think it's a shame too - an example I tend to use is Encoding, where Encoding.GetEncoding("foo") could be Encoding["Foo"]. I don't think it would come up very often, but aside from anything else it just feels a little inconsistent not to be available.

I would have to check, but I suspect it's available in IL already.

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5  
Intermediate Language - sort of assembly language for .NET. –  Jon Skeet Dec 30 '08 at 20:36
3  
What brought me here is I have a custom class that exposes a dictionary of common values used throughout my application via a static property. I was hoping to use a static indexer to shorten access from GlobalState.State[KeyName] to just GlobalState[KeyName]. Would've been nice. –  xr280xr Nov 9 '12 at 20:45

Yet another workaround:

static class ConfigurationManager
{
    public sealed class ConfigurationPropertyIndexer
    {
        public object this[string name]
        {
            get { return ConfigurationManager.getProperty(name); }
            set { ConfigurationManager.editProperty(name, value); }
        }
    }

    private static ConfigurationPropertyIndexer Indexer;

    public static ConfigurationPropertyIndexer Properties
    {
        get { return Indexer ?? (Indexer = new ConfigurationPropertyIndexer()); }
    }

    ...

}

Usage:

ConfigurationManager.Properties["ConnectionString"] = "...";
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2  
Its not too different from Juliets answer –  nawfal Apr 27 '13 at 9:04

As a work-around, you can define an instance indexer on a singleton/static object (say that ConfigurationManager is a singleton, instead of being a static class):

class ConfigurationManager
{
  //private constructor
  ConfigurationManager() {}
  //singleton instance
  public static ConfigurationManager singleton;
  //indexer
  object this[string name] { ... etc ... }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, thank you, I hadn't thought of that! –  Malfist Dec 30 '08 at 19:44

The this keyword refers to the current instance of the class. Static member functions do not have a this pointer. The this keyword can be used to access members from within constructors, instance methods, and instance accessors.(retrieved from msdn). Since this references an instance of the class it conflicts with the nature of static, since static isn't associated with an instance of the class.

One workaround would be the following which allows you to use the indexer against a private Dictionary so you only need to create a new instance and you access the static part.

    public class ConfigurationManager 
{
    public ConfigurationManager()
    {
        // TODO: Complete member initialization
    }
    public object this[string keyName]
    {
        get
        {
                return ConfigurationManagerItems[keyName];
        }
        set
        {
                ConfigurationManagerItems[keyName] = value;
        }
    }
    private static Dictionary<string, object> ConfigurationManagerItems = new Dictionary<string, object>();        
}

This allows you to skip the whole accessing a member of the class and just create an instance of it and index it.

    new ConfigurationManager()["ItemName"]
share|improve this answer
1  
its an interesting workaround, but 1) it introduces side-effects (creation of an empty instance object) which could lead to memory pressure and fragmentation in some environments, 2) the extra characters wasted by new () could have been used for qualifier name of a singleton instead, like .Current –  Lawrence Ward Mar 10 at 13:22
    
Just like Juliet's answer, this does not answer the question why static indexers are not supported. First, the question does not restrict the term "static indexer" to "something that uses the this keyword", and second, this in the syntax public string this[int index] is strictly speaking not even a use of a this pointer (as it may occur in the body of instance methods), but just another use of the token this. The syntax public static string this[int index] might look a bit counterintuitive, but it would still be unambiguous. –  O. R. Mapper 1 hour ago

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