Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to display some information on a grid queried from a sql server. The data gathering can take about 10 seconds so I don't want to lock the UI thread.

I currently have code like:

ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(DataUpdateThread, new UpdateParams(year));  

private struct UpdateParams
{
    internal string year;

    internal UpdateParams(string year)
    {
        this.year = year;
    }
}

private void DataUpdateThread(object state)
{
    DataTable dTable = new DataTable();
    try
    {
        this.Invoke((MethodInvoker)delegate
        {
            //stop data editing on the grid
            //scrolling marquee for user
            marquee.Visible = true;
            marquee.Enabled = true;
            grdMain.Visible = false;
            grdMain.DataSource = null;
        });

            UpdateParams parameters = (UpdateParams)state;            
            dTable = GetData(parameters.year);
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        this.Invoke((MethodInvoker)delegate
        {
            //log error + end user message
        });
    }
    finally
    {
        this.Invoke((MethodInvoker)delegate
        {
            grdMain.DataSource = dTable;
            grdMainLevel1.RefreshData();
            marquee.Visible = false;
            marquee.Enabled = false;
            grdMain.Visible = true;
        });
   }
}

This works most of the time apart from if the form it is on is closed before the update completes it will crash with the error:

Invoke or BeginInvoke cannot be called on a control until the window handle has been created.

I understand the error will be because the form no longer exists so when the finally section tries to invoke the method on the UI thread it can't.

Is there a better way to do this whole thing? I guess I can handle the invoke errors but it looks messy and I think I have probably missed a simpler way.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can check whether the form has been closed and don't do the invoke if the form has been closed. if (this.IsHandleCreated) should work. This can however still give problems because the form can be closed between the check and the call to BeginInvoke. The only 'full-proof' solution is then to enclose the entire call in a try/catch.

share|improve this answer
    
or this.IsHanleCreated –  Dmitry Karpezo Oct 25 '10 at 10:44
    
@Dmitry: * IsHandleCreated, right? –  abatishchev Oct 25 '10 at 10:47
    
Yep, that should work too. –  Pieter van Ginkel Oct 25 '10 at 10:47
    
Thanks that solved it. Out of curiosity is their likely any difference between the two properties? I guess the form handle is created when the form is and disposed of at the same time. –  PeteT Oct 25 '10 at 11:08
    
You should IsHandleCreated because Invoke will only work after the form has been shown. Before the show, you get the exception too. –  Pieter van Ginkel Oct 25 '10 at 11:13
show 7 more comments

Try to use InvokeRequired() before Invoke()

share|improve this answer
add comment

Invoke uses a special WinForms SynchronizationContext behind the scenes that you can access with SynchronizationContext.Current anywhere in your app.

CORRECTION after some poking in Reflector: actually Invoke goes the direct way of marshalling via PostMessage, it's the BackgroundWorker that makes use of SynchronizationContext behind the scenes. Invoke will throw if it does not have a window handle.

Basically you need to store it in a variable before you start the thread, e.g. while you're still in your UI thread, and use Post or Send method of the context in the thread's code. Doing so will marshal the stuff properly without window handles.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.